Trademark Attorney in Daniel Island SC

If you are a successful business owner, protecting your intellectual property rights is one of the most important steps that you can take to safeguard your company. Often, hiring a trademark attorney in Daniel Island to register a trademark is an arduous process that results in outrageous hourly fees and complicated paperwork.

At Sausser Summers, PC, our goal is to make the trademark registration process as straightforward and cost-effective as possible, so that you can focus on growing your business while we take the necessary steps to protect what you have worked so hard to build.

Unlike other law firms, Sausser Summers, PC provides flat fee trademark services at an affordable price. Our goal is to eliminate the uncertainty that comes with hourly work, so you know exactly how much your total expenses will be at the outset of our relationship.

With a BBB A+ rating, we are consistently ranked as one of the top trademark law firms in the U.S. We aim to provide you with the same five-star service that you would receive from large firms, with a modern twist at a rate that won’t break the bank.

How Sausser Summers, PC Flat Fee Trademark Service Works

Our flat fee trademark process is simple, streamlined, and consists of three steps:

  1. Choose your trademark service and provide us with information about your trademark through our online questionnaire. Once this is complete, you will pay the flat fee for us to move forward.
  2. Our trademark lawyers in Daniel Island will conduct an extensive search to make sure you are in the clear to register your trademark. Once our search has concluded, we will send you a legal opinion letter informing you of our search results.
  3. Our trademark attorneys will file your trademark and provide updates throughout the registration process.

Our three-step process lets you:

  1. Work one-on-one with an experienced trademark attorney in Daniel Island who will consult with you at your convenience.
  2. Save your hard-earned money with our flat fee trademark services.
  3. Gain access to a licensed trademark attorney who will file your trademark application.
  4. Get updates on your trademark application as it moves through the registration process.
  5. Focus on running your business while Sausser Summers, PC handles the hard work. No headaches, no hidden fees, no tricks.

Trademark Services at a Glance

Whether you need help maintaining your current trademark or require assistance canceling an abandoned mark, Sausser Summers, PC is here to help. Here are just a few of the trademark services that we provide to clients:

Comprehensive Trademark Search – For many entrepreneurs, this is the first and most crucial step to take when it’s time to safeguard your business and intellectual property. Your trademark attorney in Daniel Island will conduct a thorough search of the USPTO Federal Trademark Database and each U.S state’s trademark database. We will also perform a trademark domain name search and a trademark common law search on your behalf. We will follow up with a 30-minute phone call, where we will discuss the results of our trademark search and send you a drafted legal opinion letter.

U.S. Trademark Filing – Once your trademark lawyer in Daniel Island has completed a comprehensive trademark search, the next step is to file a trademark application. We will submit your application within 1-3 business days and keep you updated on its USPTO status throughout the registration process.
U.S Trademark Office Actions – These actions are essentially initial rejections of your trademark by the USPTO. Applicants have six months in which to respond to this rejection. For a flat fee, your trademark lawyer from Sausser Summers, PC will compose a response on your behalf so that you may continue to focus on your day-to-day business tasks.

U.S Trademark Renewal – If you already own a trademark, Sausser Summers, PC will renew your registered trademark so that it remains current. Extended protection varies depending on how long you have held your trademark. We encourage you to visit our U.S Trademark Renewal page to find out which renewal service best fits your current situation.

U.S. Trademark Cease & Desist – Whether you have been accused of infringing on someone’s trademark and received a cease and desist letter or have found an infringer on your own mark, it is imperative that you respond. If you have received a letter and do not respond, you might be sued. If you find an infringer and do not demand that they stop, you may lose your trademark rights. To discuss the best course of action for your situation, we recommend you contact Sausser Summers, PC, for a risk-free consultation at no additional cost. Once you speak directly to one of our attorneys, we will send your cease and desist letter or respond to the one you have received for an affordable flat fee.

Statement of Use – If you plan on using your mark in commerce, you must file a Statement of Use to notify the USPTO. This filing must take place six months after you receive your Notice of Allowance. For an affordable flat-rate fee, your trademark attorney in Daniel Island will make any requisite filings on your behalf. Before you decide on a course of action, we encourage you to contact our office at (843) 654-0078 to speak with one of our attorneys. This consultation will help us get a better understanding of your situation and is always free and confidential.

Additional U.S Trademark Attorney Services

In addition to the services listed above, we also help our clients enforce their trademarks, monitor trademark filings, and even help protect business owners from trademark infringement on platforms like Amazon and Etsy.
Have questions about our flat-fee trademark services? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your earliest convenience, so that you can preserve the one asset that sets you apart from everyone else: your name.

Latest News in Daniel Island

Perkins grad coaches state champions in South Carolina

The ultimate dream for every high school coach is to win a state championship. Bill Muhn did that dream one better, winning two at the South Carolina state meet in May when he led Philip Simmons High School to both boys and girls Class AA state track titles. Muhn is a 2001 Perkins High graduate. “We thought our boys would struggle, but they ended up winning the title by 32 points,” said Muhn. “Our girls set the state record for the largest margin of victory every with 101 points and we were actually six points...

The ultimate dream for every high school coach is to win a state championship.

Bill Muhn did that dream one better, winning two at the South Carolina state meet in May when he led Philip Simmons High School to both boys and girls Class AA state track titles. Muhn is a 2001 Perkins High graduate.

“We thought our boys would struggle, but they ended up winning the title by 32 points,” said Muhn. “Our girls set the state record for the largest margin of victory every with 101 points and we were actually six points away from setting the state record for most points ever but dropped the baton on the last handoff in the 4x100 really with about a two-second lead.”

The two state titles earned Muhn South Carolina AA Coach of the Year recognition.

“You have to have things go right on both sides,” Muhn said. “It’s a mixture of having very talented kids who bought into the system and having very knowledgeable coaches.

“A lot of this is from going to Perkins. (Late Pirates boys track coach) Jim Hauser obviously had a major impact on my life in the way he had his program set up.”

Another part of the success story is that Philip Simmons High School opened only four years ago and Muhn has had both of his teams in the top 10 in the state each year. He firmly believes his Iron Horses would be celebrating back-to-back state crowns this year, but the 2020 state meet was wiped out by COVID-19.

“We only had two kids who had ever run track before when we started the program, but one was already a state champion,” Muhn said. “Down here, we’re allowed to use middle school kids, so seventh- and eighth-graders can run.”

Noah Ward, a recent graduate who is headed to Harvard, was that state champion in the 1600 meters and has collected 11 individual state titles during his prep career in cross country and track.

“He was the kid who kind of accelerated everything,” Muhn said. “He was the guy we could turn to and show everybody what it takes to hit your goals. He always did everything right and he also got his friends to come out and run with him, so he basically started our cross country and track programs.”

The talented girls team begins with junior sprinter NaJhyrai Watson, who won the 100, 200 and 400 at the state meet.

“We had two girls who could have won the title by themselves,” Muhn said. “One, senior Layla Simpson, got seconds in both hurdles races, won the high jump and was on the 4x100 team that dropped the baton. She was why we had such a big lead.”

Early start to coaching

Injuries cost Muhn his senior track season at Perkins and ended his collegiate career at Miami of Ohio, but he made the best of both situations by turning his attention to helping teammates, which ignited a passion for coaching.

Muhn was a junior on the 1999 Perkins state football team and an all-conference safety as a senior. He also placed ninth in the state in the pole vault as a junior but was sidelined by a hamstring injury as a senior.

“I started coaching Chris Skaggs on the pole vault,” said Muhn of his senior season. “He was a freshman my senior year and that’s how I went into teaching and coaching, because I really enjoyed working with him. He ended up winning the Sandusky Bay Conference that year.”

Muhn broke his wrist while vaulting during his redshirt sophomore year at Miami and ended up working with the team's decathletes on the pole vault while also learning the nuances of the other events that make up the sport.

“In pole vaulting, it’s not if you’re going to get hurt, it’s when,” he said. “But I got to work with the decath guys and learned everything with them.”

He stopped working with his collegiate teammates as a senior while student teaching at Edgewood High School. He stayed at Edgewood for eight years, teaching middle school math and coaching football and track before moving on to Fairfield High School, where he mentored Danielle Harding, who set a national record in the event before competing on the University of Cincinnati women’s track team.

Muhn finally had enough of the harsh Ohio winters and moved south to Charleston, S.C., in 2012, and took a job as a teacher in the Daniel Island system.

“I grew up going to Hilton Head for spring break every year, so I knew I liked South Carolina,” he said. “I knew I didn’t want to go to Hilton Head because I felt it would be too touristy and I’d never heard a bad thing about Charleston, other than it’s hot in the summer and there are bugs.

“I grew up racing sailboats on Lake Erie and I wanted to get back to the water. And I was kind of tired of the cold winters in Ohio.”

Coaching in Carolina

Muhn started coaching pole vaulters with the Mount Pleasant AAU track club when he got to the area, where he also started a family. His association with the AAU squad led to his interest in the Philip Simmons coaching position when the school opened in 2017.

“I worked with the Mount Pleasant club for two years, but got away from it when I started having more going on in my life,” Muhn said. “Daniel Island is a feeder school and when Philip Simmons opened up, it was literally on my way home and had my former students on the team, so I decided to do this.”

Philip Simmons is one of the smaller schools in South Carolina but is growing rapidly. Muhn’s family is doing the same with two kids.

A growing family has Muhn thinking about stepping down as head track coach.

“I wasn’t going to coach this year had we won both titles during the COVID year,” he said. “I was going to be done because I have a 5-year-old and a just-turned 1-year-old. My wife did a fantastic job of raising them while I was away at all of those track meets and practices.

“We’re still deciding, but I’m probably going to give it one more year because I want to see Naj through and get her to the next level. She’s getting recruited pretty heavily right now.”

He also doesn’t see himself getting too far away from coaching.

“My son is at an age where I want to start coaching his teams, or at least be around,” Muhn said. “I can get back into the Mount Pleasant Track Club where I wouldn’t coach him but could coach others. I definitely enjoy coaching and being around the sport. Besides, people are always looking for track coaches, especially pole vaulters.”

The Hall Releases 2021 Fall Schedule

SOUTH ORANGE, N.J. – Head coach Clay White announced the 2021 Seton Hall men's golf fall schedule on Tuesday. The Pirates will participate in five events this fall. The Hall will open the fall season for the fourth straight time with the Alex Lagowitz Memorial, hosted by Colgate University at Seven Oaks Golf Club in Hamilton, N.Y., Sept. 4-5. Last time playing in the event, the Pirates placed third in a lar...

SOUTH ORANGE, N.J. – Head coach Clay White announced the 2021 Seton Hall men's golf fall schedule on Tuesday. The Pirates will participate in five events this fall.

The Hall will open the fall season for the fourth straight time with the Alex Lagowitz Memorial, hosted by Colgate University at Seven Oaks Golf Club in Hamilton, N.Y., Sept. 4-5. Last time playing in the event, the Pirates placed third in a large field of 18 teams with a 21-over-par, 290-297-298-885. Gregor Tait (Martlesham Heath, England) placed fifth among 96 individual golfers with a 1-over-par, 72-73-72-217. The three-round event is named in memory of the son of Seton Hall assistant coach Ian Lagowitz. Alex played collegiate golf at Colgate.

On September 20-21, the Pirates will head to Bull's Bridge Golf Club in South Kent, Conn. for the Hartford Hawks Invitational for the ninth straight time. Historically, this has been a successful event for the Pirates and 2019 was certainly no exception. In only his second collegiate tournament, Wenliang Xie (Zhaoqing, China) claimed the individual title and lifted The Hall to a third-place team finish. Xie's 10-under-par, 70-67-69-206 was the third-lowest par-72 three-round tournament score in Seton Hall history. Furthermore, he's only the fourth Pirate to finish a tournament under par by double-digits.

The Pirates will play the Georgetown Intercollegiate in Beallsville, Md. at the Members Club at Four Streams, Oct. 10-11. It will be the fourth straight fall competing in the event for The Hall. Last time, the Pirates placed 10th, finishing with a 45-over-par, 291-295-311-897. Xie was again the top Pirate finisher among returnees, tying for 15th place with a 4-over-par, 69-70-78-217.

Seton Hall will round out the fall season with a pair of new tournaments. The Pirates will play three rounds of golf at the Daniel Island Invitational on Daniel Island, S.C., hosted by Charleston Southern, Oct. 31-Nov. 2. Those who don't make the trip to South Carolina will compete at the Metropolitan Intercollegiate Championship at Montclair Golf Club, November 1-2. The event is in nearby West Orange, N.J. and hosted by Wagner College.

Pro golf, tennis add millions in revenue to economy

This article first appeared in the May 31, 2021 edition of the Charleston Regional Business Journal. Phil Mickelson’s performance at The Ocean Course at Kiawah Island in late May won the 50-year-old pro his sixth major and the PGA Championship trophy. But the big winner might have been South Carolina&rsqu...

This article first appeared in the May 31, 2021 edition of the Charleston Regional Business Journal.

Phil Mickelson’s performance at The Ocean Course at Kiawah Island in late May won the 50-year-old pro his sixth major and the PGA Championship trophy. But the big winner might have been South Carolina’s economy.

The largest event to take place in-person in South Carolina since the global pandemic ground the world’s economy to a halt, the PGA Championship is expected to bring millions directly into the Charleston region and signify that things are getting back to normal.

Over time, professional sports events have become critically important to local and statewide finances as hundreds of millions of dollars pour into towns and cities through job creation, tourism and global exposure. Even with pandemic restrictions in place, the PGA showed millions of people that South Carolina was moving forward.

Kiawah Island Golf Resort President Roger Warren called the publicity “priceless.”

The state has grown beyond its historically minor league and college sports persona, beyond its status as only a recreational golf destination with its more than 350 courses and hundreds of year-round events.

In a time where fewer fans were attending events and people aren’t traveling as much, South Carolina will be showcased to more than half a billion households worldwide.

“I think that we as an industry here in South Carolina, specifically in Charleston and Kiawah, on our own, we couldn’t pay for the amount of quality exposure we get through the TV,” Warren said.

Without a global pandemic causing chaos, the state typically plays host each year to three events by NASCAR, PGA Tour and Women’s Tennis Association. The attractions provide nearly $200 million in combined annual economic activity.

So far in 2021, the state has doubled its event tally with the PGA Championship, PGA Tour and WTA calling on South Carolina to host three additional tournaments.

In April, the Tennis Channel and WTA Media broadcasted the Volvo Car Open and MUSC Women’s Health Open tennis tournaments on Daniel Island to more than 170 countries. In late May, CBS, ESPN, the Golf Channel and other broadcast, cable and digital media platforms aired coverage of the 2021 PGA Championship to more than 175 countries.

On average, the PGA Championship media value generates more than $100 million for the host site and region, according to the PGA.

“This allows us to play with some of the larger states that we haven’t been able to before because we are a small state still,” said Duane Parrish, director of S.C. Parks, Recreation and Tourism. “But we have a lot to offer from the mountains to the sea, and golf is a big part of that.”

While the limited fan attendance has likely lowered the what-could-have-been 2021 impact — the originally estimated $200 million by the PGA Championship, for example, has since been halved — the exposure is still desperately needed for a state that relies on tourism.

“What we’re still going to see is people coming in and going to restaurants, using accommodations, heads in beds, so to speak,” said PGA Championship Director Ryan Ogle. “So there’ll still be a direct impact to the region.”

WTA Chairman and CEO Steve Simon said both the staff and players’ cherish their time each spring in Charleston because of the city’s “A+” hospitality and professionalism.

“The hospitality that’s provided and the warmth and everything else that comes with it just makes it a very special experience,” he said. “And we know that a lot of our players think Charleston’s one of their favorite stops of the year.”

Playing through the pandemic

In the last two years, South Carolina has announced more than $23.5 billion in new investments that have created almost 46,000 jobs through various industries statewide. Gov. Henry McMaster believes that the state’s growing professional sports industry further develops economic opportunities that will benefit South Carolina for years to come.

He said at a press conference in April that “by seizing this once-in-a lifetime opportunity” and sponsoring a third professional golf tournament in a single year, the state is helping to lift up small businesses in the hospitality industry that have been devastated by the pandemic.

“This is great progress, and I expect that we will be seeing ourselves on television and in advertisements in sports channels wall-to-wall during the entire time of those three months,” the governor said.

At the tail end of that period will be the Palmetto Championship at Congaree, beginning June 10, which Parrish anticipates will bring in a further $50 million for the state. The revenue was unexpected as the tournament was a last-minute replacement for a canceled PGA Tour event in Canada.

Even with limited tickets available, the total impact from the Palmetto Championship is still double that from 2019 when the Country Club of Charleston hosted the U.S. Women’s Open and welcomed nearly 100,000 spectators. Charleston was selected as the official site of the 74th annual tournament, held May 30-June 2, 2019.

Like the Congaree golf tournament, the MUSC Health Women’s Open similarly came about after a pandemic-related cancellation. The Billie Jean King Cup tennis tournament held in Hungary was postponed until February, and the WTA needed to fill the calendar void. Simon said the Charleston team’s efficiency and dedication — not to mention the fact that Daniel Island already had infrastructure and protocols in place — made the decision on where to relocate a no-brainer.

“We love being in Charleston… I think it reflects the strength of the partnership we have with everyone in Charleston that we all sat down and talked and agreed it would be best to run two events there back-to-back,” Simon said.

Charleston’s partnership with WTA dates back nearly 50 years to when South Carolina first hosted the formerly named Family Circle Cup on Hilton Head Island in 1973. The tournament has been held on Daniel Island since 2001, and Simon said the event is here for the long-haul.

“This is an investment, a long-term venture,” he said. “There are no plans to move it, and you don’t want to. If you want people to invest into an asset, and you want them to build the infrastructure to make this special, then you have to make a long-term commitment.”

Since both WTA tournaments took place without fans, the WTA pivoted this year by creating a global made-for-TV event. Full coverage from South Carolina was served over a two-week span.

“We’ll have great footage from Charleston and Daniel Island that’s seen by more than 20 million additional fans across the world. That impact is enormous,” Volvo Car Open Tournament Director Bob Moran said.

And those impacts go beyond the weeklong hotel stays and live action. Warren said that in 2012, after the PGA Championship wrapped up, the Lowcountry experienced a trickle-down effect for months.

“Our businesses jumped from August 2012 to 2013, and we had a very significant exposure in our business,” he said. “Everyone felt it. So I feel there is some anticipation. That’s what I’m excited about.”

Defending PGA Champion Collin Morikawa was equally excited talking about the tournament during an April visit to The Ocean Course at Kiawah Island. He said the May event was a “big star” on his calendar.

“We’re peaking at a good time, and we’re really looking forward to this kind of next few months of golf because there’s a lot of good golf to be played,” he said.

Credit One Bank to take over as title sponsor of Charleston tennis tournament and stadium

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The newly renovated tennis stadium on Daniel Island and the WTA Tour event that are played there have new sponsors. Charleston Tennis, LLC announced that Credit One Bank is the new title sponsor of the tournament and will take over naming right of the Credit One Stadium. The company has committed to a multi-year title sponsorship it was announced on Wednesday. “The future of live tennis is a bright spot for us, building and planning for what the future will look like for the new Credit One...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The newly renovated tennis stadium on Daniel Island and the WTA Tour event that are played there have new sponsors.

Charleston Tennis, LLC announced that Credit One Bank is the new title sponsor of the tournament and will take over naming right of the Credit One Stadium.

The company has committed to a multi-year title sponsorship it was announced on Wednesday.

“The future of live tennis is a bright spot for us, building and planning for what the future will look like for the new Credit One Stadium.” Bob Moran, president of Charleston Tennis, LLC said at a press conference. “After nearly 18 months of navigating postponements and cancelations, we look forward to bringing world-class tennis back to Charleston each April and broadening our reach to bigger and better concerts and special events throughout the year,”

The tournament and the stadium had both been sponsored by Volvo Cars since 2015. Before that the tournament had been called the Family Circle Cup.

The official name for the tournament will be announced at a later date.

“We’re proud to be working with Charleston Tennis, LLC, and the City of Charleston to build on the great history of this tournament and give the passionate fan base in the area and women’s tennis players from around the world a great experience at a state-of-the-art venue,” said John Coombe, senior vice president of marketing at Credit One. “We want to grow the Credit One brand name throughout the region while continuing to invest in entertainment and community programs important to our customers and fans.”

“We welcome Credit One to the WTA Tour in its commitment to both serve as the title sponsor of the Charleston WTA 500 tournament and in placing its name on the newly renovated, state-of-the-art stadium in which the event is played,” said Steve Simon, WTA chairman and CEO. “Charleston has a rich history with the WTA as one of the longest standing women’s-only professional tennis tournaments in the world, and is a Tour favorite among the players. We look forward to working with Credit One, along with all of the sponsors, to continue the growth and success of this prestigious tournament for many years to come.”

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

SC prepares for close-to-normal summer schedule for annual golf tournaments

Tee sheets are still filled, tournaments receive so many entries that qualifying rounds are often necessary, and equipment sales keep cash registers jingling in pro shops. Indeed, the re-kindling of golf — represented by everyone from the top-level pros to recreational duffers — remains strong, a little more than a year after players rediscovered the sport amid the coronavirus outbreak. “A lot more of people just want to play golf now,” said Biff Lathrop, executive director of the South Carolina Golf Ass...

Tee sheets are still filled, tournaments receive so many entries that qualifying rounds are often necessary, and equipment sales keep cash registers jingling in pro shops.

Indeed, the re-kindling of golf — represented by everyone from the top-level pros to recreational duffers — remains strong, a little more than a year after players rediscovered the sport amid the coronavirus outbreak.

“A lot more of people just want to play golf now,” said Biff Lathrop, executive director of the South Carolina Golf Association.

Pros around the Midlands report that the increase in participation that begin last year with people seeking outdoor activity during the pandemic remains strong. Along the Grand Strand, business is booming.

The SCGA received more than 400 entries, the most in years, for the South Carolina Amateur, and the quality of players makes qualifying more challenging than ever.

“It’s pretty daunting (for a player) to stand on the first tee and know he needs to shoot par to make the Amateur field,” Lathrop said.

The Amateur, set for Aug. 5-8 at DeBordieu near Georgetown, and the South Carolina Women’s Open, which will be played Aug. 13-15 at Cobblestone Park GC in Blythewood, are big events later in the summer.

Meanwhile, the Columbia men’s and women’s championships, canceled by the pandemic last summer, will unfold over a six-day stretch in mid-July. The Midlands Chevy Dealers men’s tourney will be played July 15-17 at the Spur at Northwoods, and the Sonic women’s event is set for July 19-20 at the CC of Lexington.

Madison Branum won the 2019 women’s title and Nancy Dodge will be seeking to win the senior competition for the sixth straight year. Jarrett Grimes (overall), Walter Odiorne (seniors) and Jimmy Martin (super seniors) will defend their men’s championships.

“We’ll have 115 to 120 players, and if it’s anything like 2019, we will have an exciting tournament,” said Allen Knight, the men’s tournament director.

Grimes edged John Obrien and Zach McLain by one stroke to win the 2019 title with the championship hanging in the balance on the final putts. Odiorne earned his third straight seniors title, edging Bob Edens on the third playoff hole. Martin used a strong finishing kick to lead the super seniors for the second time.

Former champions among the early entries include Grimes, who will be seeking his third title, Robert Dargan, Eddie Hargett and Brian Lee. “Plus, with players such as Brad Krapfel, David Dargan. Matthew Hutto and Jonathan Mathias, we have a really strong field,” Knight said.

The tournament will continue to use COVID protocols and players will be required to leave the course after completing their rounds.

Leading into those tournaments will be the Palmetto Amateur, set for Wednesday to Saturday at Palmetto GC in Aiken. The field of 78 includes players from 14 states and 10 international competitors.

Nick Lyerly, who plays for UNC Greensboro, heads the field. He finished fourth in the 2020 Palmetto and is currently ranked 85th in the world amateur golf rankings. Jonathan Griz, a high-schooler from Hilton Head who became the youngest State Amateur champion in 2020, also will compete.

“It’s a great time for golf everywhere and especially in South Carolina,” the SCGA’s Lathrop said. “Clubs and organizations have done a great job during the pandemic, and we need to do our part to keep the momentum going in the days ahead.

“People have learned any age and any gender can get out and enjoy the game. The number of players we have at all levels is encouraging for the future.”

Chip shots. Brent Roof (Columbia) won his sixth SCGA Lefthanders title and teamed with brother Barry Roof (Myrtle Beach) to claim the Lefty-Righty championship at Lake Marion GC in Santee. In seniors’ competition, Rich Weston (Pawleys Island) captured the Lefthanders title and joined with Steve Horton (Moncks Corner) to lead the lefty-righty field. . . . Jensen Castle (West Columbia) and Rachel Kuehn (Asheville, North Carolina) combined to win their second straight Carolinas Women’s Four-Ball title at Orangeburg CC. Jayne Pardus (Mt. Pleasant) and Kerry Rutan (Daniel Island) earned the senior division championship. . . . Jason Steiner (Fort Mill) edged Brian Quackenbush (Aiken) 1-up to claim the South Carolina Match-Play title at Mount Vintage GC in North Augusta. . . . In juniors’ competition, Rowan Sullivan (Charleston) won the SCGA’s State Junior title at Forest Lake Club, Madison Messimer (Myrtle Beach) prevailed in the WSCGA’s Junior Girls tournament at Arcadian Shores GC in Myrtle Beach and Walker Jennings (Greenville) captured the Grant Bennett Florence Junior Invitational at Florence CC.

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