Trademark Attorney in Kiawah Island, SC

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At Sausser Summers, PC, our goal is to make the trademark registration process as straightforward and cost-effective as possible, so that you can focus on growing your business while we take the necessary steps to protect what you have worked so hard to build.

Unlike other law firms, Sausser Summers, PC provides flat fee trademark services at an affordable price. Our goal is to eliminate the uncertainty that comes with hourly work, so you know exactly how much your total expenses will be at the outset of our relationship.

With a BBB A+ rating, we are consistently ranked as one of the top trademark law firms in the U.S. We aim to provide you with the same five-star service that you would receive from large firms, with a modern twist at a rate that won’t break the bank.

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How Sausser Summers, PC Flat Fee Trademark Service Works

Our flat fee trademark process is simple, streamlined, and consists of three steps:

Our three-step process lets you:

Trademark Services at a Glance

Whether you need help maintaining your current trademark or require assistance canceling an abandoned mark, Sausser Summers, PC is here to help. Here are just a few of the trademark services that we provide to clients:

Comprehensive Trademark Search

For many entrepreneurs, this is the first and most crucial step to take when it’s time to safeguard your business and intellectual property. Your trademark attorney in Kiawah Island will conduct a thorough search of the USPTO Federal Trademark Database and each U.S state’s trademark database. We will also perform a trademark domain name search and a trademark common law search on your behalf. We will follow up with a 30-minute phone call, where we will discuss the results of our trademark search and send you a drafted legal opinion letter.

U.S. Trademark Filing

Once your trademark lawyer in Kiawah Island has completed a comprehensive trademark search, the next step is to file a trademark application. We will submit your application within 1-3 business days and keep you updated on its USPTO status throughout the registration process.

U.S Trademark Office Actions – These actions are essentially initial rejections of your trademark by the USPTO. Applicants have six months in which to respond to this rejection. For a flat fee, your trademark lawyer from Sausser Summers, PC will compose

U.S Trademark Renewal

If you already own a trademark, Sausser Summers, PC will renew your registered trademark so that it remains current. Extended protection varies depending on how long you have held your trademark. We encourage you to visit our U.S Trademark Renewal page to find out which renewal service best fits your current situation.

U.S. Trademark Cease & Desist

Whether you have been accused of infringing on someone’s trademark and received a cease and desist letter or have found an infringer on your own mark, it is imperative that you respond. If you have received a letter and do not respond, you might be sued. If you find an infringer and do not demand that they stop, you may lose your trademark rights. To discuss the best course of action for your situation, we recommend you contact Sausser Summers, PC, for a risk-free consultation at no additional cost. Once you speak directly to one of our attorneys, we will send your cease and desist letter or respond to the one you have received for an affordable flat fee.

Statement of Use

If you plan on using your mark in commerce, you must file a Statement of Use to notify the USPTO. This filing must take place six months after you receive your Notice of Allowance. For an affordable flat-rate fee, your trademark attorney in Kiawah Island will make any requisite filings on your behalf. Before you decide on a course of action, we encourage you to contact our office at (843) 654-0078 to speak with one of our attorneys. This consultation will help us get a better understanding of your situation and is always free and confidential.

U.S. Trademark Filing of Name and Logo

I Have a Word Mark & Logo!

*USPTO filing fee of $250 for one international class is included, as mentioned above. Additional fees will apply if multiple classes. If you have any questions about the total cost please contact us prior to submitting this form.

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Latest News in Kiawah Island

How South Carolina’s Kiawah Island strikes a balance between tourism and conservation

From inside of Voysey’s, the private restaurant that overlooks Kiawah Island’s Cassique course, a diner might be tricked into believing that this country club island is just like any other luxury destination. The windows that frame the course betray swaying grasses, moody greens and nearly imperceptible stick-figure golfers enjoying the splendor of one of the country’s most celebrated golf courses.But the barrier island of Kiawah, some 25 miles south of Charleston, S.C., is more than a golf destination with premier b...

From inside of Voysey’s, the private restaurant that overlooks Kiawah Island’s Cassique course, a diner might be tricked into believing that this country club island is just like any other luxury destination. The windows that frame the course betray swaying grasses, moody greens and nearly imperceptible stick-figure golfers enjoying the splendor of one of the country’s most celebrated golf courses.

But the barrier island of Kiawah, some 25 miles south of Charleston, S.C., is more than a golf destination with premier beachfront homes. Kiawah Island has solidified itself as one of the most eco-friendly residential areas and tourist destinations in the United States, with conservation efforts dating back nearly half a century. Visitors are the beneficiaries of these extensive efforts, and the island is a rare example of how tourism and ecological concern can coexist.

In 1973, Kiawah Island established the Kiawah Turtle Patrol, an organization that tracks and protects the island’s native population of nesting loggerhead turtles. Soon after, Kiawah Investment, a Kuwaiti-owned company, purchased the island from heirs to a lumber company operator and, in 1975, conducted an environmental inventory of the island over the course of 16 months, studying natural habitats, wildlife and archaeological history, said Donna Windham, executive director of the Kiawah Conservancy.

The widespread inventory led to a master plan, which has since been enacted by the town of Kiawah, that combines environmental activism with tourism and leisure. “It was a whole new environment for them,” Windham said of the Kuwaiti effort. “They took it very seriously that this island was special.” Today, Windham said, the Kiawah Conservancy operates as a nonprofit land trust for the island, encouraging the protection of the environment by working in conjunction with landowners.

The conservancy, established in 1997, can hold land and issue easements. It has, to date, preserved “2,273 acres of Kiawah’s 10,000 acres,” according to the island’s website. In January 2000, Windham said, 152 acres of land known as Little Bear Island — a nesting destination for coastal birds such as the piping plover, peregrine falcon and osprey — were preserved by the Wetlands America Trust, part of the Ducks Unlimited nonprofit conservation group. The easement was updated in 2007 to include protection from the trust and the Kiawah Island Natural Habitat Conservancy.

As a traveler, you may see no concrete indication of the infrastructure that governs the island’s conservation. Yet the influence is everywhere, evident in the clamoring hermit crabs at the shoreline, the robust oyster beds that climb upward on the riverbanks, and the petite raccoons that scale trees at dusk in search of their next meal.

Close to the island’s Ocean Course, where a strip of cerulean is just visible beyond the marsh, a passerby might be privy to any number of natural encounters: alligators with snouts just visible in the pond water; hook-necked blue herons staring out into the palmettos; white-tailed deer bedding down beneath the drapery of Spanish moss. These moments, despite their frequency, arrive as a surprise in a place where golf clubs and impeccable architecture are the local currency.

But you’re more likely than not to encounter a wild animal during your visit, and that’s because Kiawah Island includes 3,000 acres of tidal salt marsh and 10 miles of shoreline, providing shelter for a variety of wildlife. According to town of Kiawah Wildlife Biologist Jim Jordan — his position was created in 2000 and, eight years later, Assistant Wildlife Biologist Aaron Given arrived — there are 315 species of birds, more than 30 species of mammals, more than 40 species of reptiles, more than 20 species of amphibians, and thousands of invertebrates that call the island home.

“It’s pretty unique,” Jordan said. It is, he said, “a functioning, intact ecosystem that’s working the way it would have worked if there were no houses there.”

One of the island’s most fascinating predators is the bobcat; the current bobcat population, Jordan said, is between 15 and 20. Four to six bobcats are collared by the biology team each year, so their movements can be tracked via GPS. “Visitors and residents can look at the tracking maps online and see where they’ve been,” he said.

Take a boat out onto the serene Kiawah River — you can book tours through the island’s sole resort, the Kiawah Island Golf Resort — and you’re bound to see a dolphin or two, gray fin slipping in and out of the water. These are the island’s bottlenose species, and they’re friendly, tracking vessels and providing the occasional show, flippers aflight. They also engage in a unique behavior known as “strand-feeding.”

“In a coordinated effort, they will basically force a school of fish or a school of shrimp up toward the bank,” Jordan said. “They beach themselves.” The western end of the island makes for good viewing of this behavior, although he warned that disrupting dolphins during their strand-feeds can be harmful. “It’s a learned behavior,” passed down from generation to generation, Jordan said. Should a strand-feed get interrupted, dolphins could abandon the behavior entirely, thus keeping future generations from learning how to eat in this location-specific manner.

The serenity experienced on this island oasis is thanks to more than just the work of the conservancy. At the Sanctuary at Kiawah Island Golf Resort, for instance, an AAA five-diamond resort that was built in 2004, live, mature oak trees were transplanted to help promote the maintenance of the natural environment. “This really wasn’t required. It was just something that we did voluntarily, because we thought it was the right thing to do,” said Bryan Hunter, director of public relations for the Kiawah Island Golf Resort.

The resort, he said, places a premium on conservation efforts, encouraging guests to immerse themselves in the local environment through organized boat trips to other barrier islands, alligator safaris and dolphin-viewing excursions. Visitors can also tag along with the Turtle Patrol in the morning in search of hatching and migration patterns (although that program has been greatly restricted because of the coronavirus pandemic). Some may even get to assist hatchling turtles, Hunter said. Those who join the Turtle Patrol outings look for nests, take notes and record observations about the year’s hatch.

One conservation effort enforced by island residents — including hoteliers — is the Lights Out for Sea Turtles initiative, which requires that beach-illuminating lights be turned off in the evenings during loggerhead nesting season. As Jordan pointed out, artificial light confuses hatchling turtles, often accidentally guiding them away from the ocean.

Low light pollution, Hunter said, is “vital.” “The resort, along with the rest of the island, through town ordinance, makes sure that we really carefully monitor light pollution along the beach, so that it doesn’t disorient nesting sea turtles or hatching sea turtles,” he said.

As the sun descends at dusk, there is a vibration in the air. Is it the cicadas, on their 17-year cycle? Or maybe just a faraway flock of birds? Whatever the origin of the ambient noise, it calls to mind a soothing bedtime melody, the kind you might slip into as you wind down into sleep.

Potential travelers should take local and national public health directives regarding the pandemic into consideration before planning any trips. Travel health notice information can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's interactive map showing travel recommendations by destination and the CDC's travel health notice webpage.

This AAA five-diamond property has 255 guest rooms and suites, as well as multiple dining venues and direct beach access. Rooms from about $240.

Run by the Kiawah Island Golf Resort, this 1.5-hour boat excursion takes guests through creeks and marshes in search of the island’s native bottlenose dolphin population. $450 for up to six passengers.

Situated on the west end of the island, this ocean beach offers the only public access on Kiawah. Amenities include lifeguards, chair and umbrella rentals, restrooms, outdoor showers, a snack bar and a picnic area with grills. Parking $5 to $15 per vehicle.

Guests can ask resident wildlife biologists about the local ecology and visit with some of the native and nonnative species, such as diamondback terrapins and a 10-foot-long Burmese python. The center’s gift shop sells handcrafted items made by local artists. Free.

Walk or bike this one-mile scenic trail that extends over the marsh to a lookout tower. Part of the larger Kiawah Island bike trails system, which covers about 30 miles, this trail is suitable for all ages.

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Kiawah Island celebrates second annual 'Save Kiawah Bobcats Week'

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Once on the decline, the Kiawah bobcat population is making a comeback.It all started about four years ago when biologists noticed a change. The main reason- anticoagulants in rodenticides.“The primary cause for the decline was direct mortality from basically bobcats bio-accumulating these anticoagulants in their system, basically causing them to die," said Town of Kiawah Biologist Jim Jordan.However, this year there have been some positive trends in the population. One of th...

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Once on the decline, the Kiawah bobcat population is making a comeback.

It all started about four years ago when biologists noticed a change. The main reason- anticoagulants in rodenticides.

“The primary cause for the decline was direct mortality from basically bobcats bio-accumulating these anticoagulants in their system, basically causing them to die," said Town of Kiawah Biologist Jim Jordan.

However, this year there have been some positive trends in the population. One of those trends show two of the three female bobcats with collars have successfully had kittens- something they did not see last year.

“This year, our survival rate for the cats is 83%. So five out of six that we captured this past winter are still alive. Whereas in the prior two years, our survival rates were between 25 and 33%. So we've almost tripled or quadrupled the survival rate,” said Jordan.

People who live and work on the island have seen the bobcats and explain how beneficial the predators are to the environment around them.

“I was here about a week and a half ago coming into work about 9:30 and I encountered a bobcat mother and she was kind of walking along the edge of the parking lot and was looking for food. This is probably about first time I’ve ever personally seen one in my life," said resident Bill Kufner.

“These encounters are actually a good sign that the environment's not being changed because of the buildings and stuff going up. I think it has a big environmental impact to have a predatory animal on the island other than the American alligator that we have here," he said.

Kiawah town council created a campaign that allows residents to take a pledge to not use rodenticides.

“it is a voluntary program and when they pledge, they become what we call a Bobcat Guardian and Save Kiawah Bobcats Week is actually just a continuation of being able to put the information out there and make people aware of it every year," said Stephanie Braswell, Town of Kiawah Communications Manager.

This is the second annual Save Kiawah Bobcats Week, which has been deemed the second week of October. Be sure to follow Town of Kiawah on social media to see rare footage and to take the pledge.

How Kiawah Island, S.C., keeps itself a haven for golfers and wildlife alike

From inside of Voysey’s, the private restaurant that overlooks Kiawah Island’s Cassique course, a diner might be tricked into believing that this country club island is just like any other luxury destination. The windows that frame the course betray swaying grasses, moody greens and nearly imperceptible stick-figure golfers enjoying the splendor of one of the country’s most celebrated golf courses.But the barrier island of Kiawah, some 25 miles south of Charleston, S.C., is more than a golf destination with premier b...

From inside of Voysey’s, the private restaurant that overlooks Kiawah Island’s Cassique course, a diner might be tricked into believing that this country club island is just like any other luxury destination. The windows that frame the course betray swaying grasses, moody greens and nearly imperceptible stick-figure golfers enjoying the splendor of one of the country’s most celebrated golf courses.

But the barrier island of Kiawah, some 25 miles south of Charleston, S.C., is more than a golf destination with premier beachfront homes. Kiawah Island has solidified itself as one of the most eco-friendly residential areas and tourist destinations in the United States, with conservation efforts dating back nearly half a century. Visitors are the beneficiaries of these extensive efforts, and the island is a rare example of how tourism and ecological concern can coexist.

In 1973, Kiawah Island established the Kiawah Turtle Patrol, an organization that tracks and protects the island’s native population of nesting loggerhead turtles. Soon after, Kiawah Investment, a Kuwaiti-owned company, purchased the island from heirs to a lumber company operator and, in 1975, conducted an environmental inventory of the island over the course of 16 months, studying natural habitats, wildlife and archaeological history, said Donna Windham, executive director of the Kiawah Conservancy.

The widespread inventory led to a master plan, which has since been enacted by the town of Kiawah, that combines environmental activism with tourism and leisure. “It was a whole new environment for them,” Windham said of the Kuwaiti effort. “They took it very seriously that this island was special.” Today, Windham said, the Kiawah Conservancy operates as a nonprofit land trust for the island, encouraging the protection of the environment by working in conjunction with landowners.

The conservancy, established in 1997, can hold land and issue easements. It has, to date, preserved “2,273 acres of Kiawah’s 10,000 acres,” according to the island’s website. In January 2000, Windham said, 152 acres of land known as Little Bear Island — a nesting destination for coastal birds such as the piping plover, peregrine falcon and osprey — were preserved by the Wetlands America Trust, part of the Ducks Unlimited nonprofit conservation group. The easement was updated in 2007 to include protection from the trust and the Kiawah Island Natural Habitat Conservancy.

As a traveler, you may see no concrete indication of the infrastructure that governs the island’s conservation. Yet the influence is everywhere, evident in the clamoring hermit crabs at the shoreline, the robust oyster beds that climb upward on the riverbanks, and the petite raccoons that scale trees at dusk in search of their next meal.

Close to the island’s Ocean Course, where a strip of cerulean is just visible beyond the marsh, a passerby might be privy to any number of natural encounters: alligators with snouts just visible in the pond water; hook-necked blue herons staring out into the palmettos; white-tailed deer bedding down beneath the drapery of Spanish moss. These moments, despite their frequency, arrive as a surprise in a place where golf clubs and impeccable architecture are the local currency.

But you’re more likely than not to encounter a wild animal during your visit, and that’s because Kiawah Island includes 3,000 acres of tidal salt marsh and 10 miles of shoreline, providing shelter for a variety of wildlife. According to town of Kiawah Wildlife Biologist Jim Jordan — his position was created in 2000 and, eight years later, Assistant Wildlife Biologist Aaron Given arrived — there are 315 species of birds, more than 30 species of mammals, more than 40 species of reptiles, more than 20 species of amphibians, and thousands of invertebrates that call the island home.

“It’s pretty unique,” Jordan said. It is, he said, “a functioning, intact ecosystem that’s working the way it would have worked if there were no houses there.”

One of the island’s most fascinating predators is the bobcat; the current bobcat population, Jordan said, is between 15 and 20. Four to six bobcats are collared by the biology team each year, so their movements can be tracked via GPS. “Visitors and residents can look at the tracking maps online and see where they’ve been,” he said.

Take a boat out onto the serene Kiawah River — you can book tours through the island’s sole resort, the Kiawah Island Golf Resort — and you’re bound to see a dolphin or two, gray fin slipping in and out of the water. These are the island’s bottlenose species, and they’re friendly, tracking vessels and providing the occasional show, flippers aflight. They also engage in a unique behavior known as “strand-feeding.”

“In a coordinated effort, they will basically force a school of fish or a school of shrimp up toward the bank,” Jordan said. “They beach themselves.” The western end of the island makes for good viewing of this behavior, although he warned that disrupting dolphins during their strand-feeds can be harmful. “It’s a learned behavior,” passed down from generation to generation, Jordan said. Should a strand-feed get interrupted, dolphins could abandon the behavior entirely, thus keeping future generations from learning how to eat in this location-specific manner.

The serenity experienced on this island oasis is thanks to more than just the work of the conservancy. At the Sanctuary at Kiawah Island Golf Resort, for instance, an AAA five-diamond resort that was built in 2004, live, mature oak trees were transplanted to help promote the maintenance of the natural environment. “This really wasn’t required. It was just something that we did voluntarily, because we thought it was the right thing to do,” said Bryan Hunter, director of public relations for the Kiawah Island Golf Resort.

The resort, he said, places a premium on conservation efforts, encouraging guests to immerse themselves in the local environment through organized boat trips to other barrier islands, alligator safaris and dolphin-viewing excursions. Visitors can also tag along with the Turtle Patrol in the morning in search of hatching and migration patterns (although that program has been greatly restricted because of the coronavirus pandemic). Some may even get to assist hatchling turtles, Hunter said. Those who join the Turtle Patrol outings look for nests, take notes and record observations about the year’s hatch.

One conservation effort enforced by island residents — including hoteliers — is the Lights Out for Sea Turtles initiative, which requires that beach-illuminating lights be turned off in the evenings during loggerhead nesting season. As Jordan pointed out, artificial light confuses hatchling turtles, often accidentally guiding them away from the ocean.

Low light pollution, Hunter said, is “vital.” “The resort, along with the rest of the island, through town ordinance, makes sure that we really carefully monitor light pollution along the beach, so that it doesn’t disorient nesting sea turtles or hatching sea turtles,” he said.

As the sun descends at dusk, there is a vibration in the air. Is it the cicadas, on their 17-year cycle? Or maybe just a faraway flock of birds? Whatever the origin of the ambient noise, it calls to mind a soothing bedtime melody, the kind you might slip into as you wind down into sleep.

And conservation-minded tourists will sleep just fine.

Jim's Caddie Corner: A terrific season on the local links

It has been a great golf season and there is still some nice weather in the forecast. However, there are some cool days ahead and Mother Nature has plans for the near future. This is the perfect time to plan a golf getaway down south. So many golfers enjoy traveling to Florida for a golf vacation but there are some great destinations in South Carolina and Georgia that you may want to consider over the next three to four weeks if you can get away.The weather in the Southeast is still very nice with temperatures in the 70s. That is cert...

It has been a great golf season and there is still some nice weather in the forecast. However, there are some cool days ahead and Mother Nature has plans for the near future. This is the perfect time to plan a golf getaway down south. So many golfers enjoy traveling to Florida for a golf vacation but there are some great destinations in South Carolina and Georgia that you may want to consider over the next three to four weeks if you can get away.

The weather in the Southeast is still very nice with temperatures in the 70s. That is certainly pleasant weather to play golf and enjoy other outdoor activities. Even when the weather dips down into the 60s, you can play lots of golf and enjoy a stroll along the beach. There are lots of good deals on flights to Myrtle Beach, S.C.

They are still offering flights from Manchester for a few more weeks with some very good prices. Otherwise, Spirit Airlines also offers direct flights from Boston to Myrtle Beach. You can even travel to Logan International Airport by bus with Concord Coach Lines from the Eastern Slope Inn in North Conway. It is a comfortable and convenient way to get to the airport, without dealing with traffic and parking. The bus service brings you directly to the airport terminal.

There are a variety of golf courses and accommodations in Myrtle Beach, they have more ranked golf courses there than any other U.S. destination. The Dunes Golf and Beach Club, Caledonia Golf and Fish Club, True Blue Golf Club, King’s North at Myrtle Beach National, Moorland Course at Legends Resort, Grand Dunes Resort Course and three courses at Barefoot Resort are amongst the best and most challenging courses in the area.

Visit barefootresortvacations.com and visitmyrtlebeach.com for more information on some of the golf courses that Golfweek ranks as Top Resort Courses.

Another great option is Charleston, S.C., with lots of great golf courses and excellent restaurants. If you want to experience southern hospitality at its finest, consider Charleston and enjoy the historical architecture in the downtown area. While you are in Charleston, Kiawah Island is a great day trip to play golf, it is about 45 minutes away. Kiawah Island is also a great destination, relax in low country, South Carolina.

Kiawah Island Resort is world-class and they hosted the 2012 and 2021 PGA Championship. It is a high-end resort that offers world-class accommodations, golf and 10 miles of beaches. The resort is award-winning and recognized with AAA Five Diamond and Forbes Five Stars ratings.

There is also Hilton Head Island in South Carolina, less than one hour from Savannah, Ga. It is one of the premier golf destinations in the country. Visit hiltonheadisland.org and consider a stay and play package. This would probably save you money on greens fees. The golf courses there are very good, the prices vary by course. There are fewer crowds, the temperatures in October-November are in the 60s and low 70s during the day. That is great weather to play golf, especially since we are used to cooler temperatures in northern New Hampshire.

Continuing further south into Georgia, Jekyll Island offers four golf courses, three of which are municipal courses and affordable. If you are looking for a quiet getaway, with peace and serenity, this might be the perfect place for you to enjoy golfing and relaxing. Check out www.jekyllisland.com for more information.

If you can get away for a trip to the warmer weather, you should be able to find some deals since this is a quiet time for these areas before Thanksgiving week. Enjoy reading up on these areas and consider even a long weekend or better yet a midweek getaway over the next few weeks. Lodging rates drop, fewer crowds and the golf courses often have midweek specials. Otherwise, put it on your list of things to do in February/March 2022 when the weather warms up again in the South.

The golf season is winding down here in the Mount Washington Valley. Here are some recent results and news from a few of the local golf courses.

Hale’s Location Golf Course, West Side Road, North Conway, (603) 356-2140: Here are the winners of the Three Tee Tournament — first place Mike Albarelli, Barbara Plonski, Scott Matthews and Cathy Steesy. Second place Ed Chappee, Suzanne McCarthy, Tom Proulx and Mary Jane Proulx.

Lake Kezar Country Club, Route 5, Lovell, Maine, (207) 925-2462: Recently, Friends of Conway Rec held its golf tournament. It was a good turnout, with prizes awarded to both men and mixed division.

LKCC held its annual Cross-Country Scramble on Oct. 3. It was a rainy start, but the weather soon cleared. The event had a very interesting format for playing 9 holes. Just an example you tee off on 18 and hole out on 1. The few groups that played had a good time.

The last club event for the season is the Turkey Shoot Scramble on Oct. 17. Call the clubhouse to sign up. Lot’s of turkey-related prizes are awarded.

LKCC will be open until Oct. 31, weather permitting.

Eagle Mountain Golf Course, Carter Notch Road, Jackson, (603) 383-9090: The final week of Don Ho finds the Par Tee team in first place at -25.

Team members sweeping the Spring and Fall competition were Chris Bates, Steve Piowtrow, Rick Storm and Andy Narducci. In second at -18 was the Chislas followed by the Jocular Jewelers in third at -17. The Switchback team and the Marteenies finished tied for fourth place at -14.

Ann Bennett and Chris Bates won the last long drive contest.

Wentworth Golf Club, Route 16, Jackson, (603) 383-9641: The Cross-Country Tournament is scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 24. Anyone interested in bringing a team please call the pro shop.

Indian Mound Golf Course, Center Ossipee, (603) 539-7733: The 13th annual Kennett Hockey Golf Tournament, held on Oct. 10. attracted a record of 30 teams. “It went really well,” reports Indian Mound’s Jonathan Rivers.

North Conway Country Club, Norcross Circle, North Conway, (603) 356-5244: Will be closing for the season on Oct. 31.

Omni Mount Washington, Bretton Woods, (603) 278-4653: The Mount Washington Resort Golf Club offers a variety of lessons and workshops to help golfers of all levels of ability improve their game. All clinic schedules are subject to change due to weather or other factors. Please contact the Pro Shop to book your lesson or for the latest details at (603) 278-GOLF (4653). Please check in at the Pro Shop at least 10 minutes before the start of the lesson.

Thank you to all the local area golf courses and their staff for working hard during this 2021 golf season. It is great that it was a busy season and we had some good weather. And thank you to all the golfers that supported the local golf courses all season.

“If you drink, don’t drive. Don’t even putt.” — Dean Martin

Let us know if you have any great local stories or photos that we can include in an upcoming column. Contact Jim at mcfadyengolf@outlook.com or Lloyd Jones at lloyd@conwaydailysun.com.

Jim McFadyen is a golf columnist and can be reached at mcfadyengolf@outlook.com.

Wednesday headlines: Haley tapped for lifetime Clemson board seat

Former S.C. Gov. and United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley, who now lives at Kiawah Island, has been appointed to fill a lifetime seat on the Clemson University Board of Trustees vacated by former House Speaker David Wilkins of Greenville. Wilkins also served as ambassador to Canada in the Bush administration in the early 2000s. More: SC Public Radio, ...

Former S.C. Gov. and United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley, who now lives at Kiawah Island, has been appointed to fill a lifetime seat on the Clemson University Board of Trustees vacated by former House Speaker David Wilkins of Greenville. Wilkins also served as ambassador to Canada in the Bush administration in the early 2000s. More: SC Public Radio, The Post and Courier

In other headlines:

First in-person S.C. State Fair since start of pandemic opens today. The South Carolina State Fair returns Wednesday after last year’s drive-thru event brought on by higher numbers of infections during the height of the coronavirus pandemic. More: Associated Press, The State, The Post and Courier

Civil rights groups sue McMaster, state lawmakers over redistricting process. Two civil rights groups are suing South Carolina, saying state lawmakers are taking too long to draw new district maps. More: Associated Press, WCSC TV, The State, The Post and Courier

Charleston ports operating smoothly despite record volume, supply chain woes. More ships are adjusting their schedules to visit Charleston-area ports earlier than planned, with cargo continuing to move smoothly despite record volumes. More: The Post and Courier

Sullivan’s Island seeks attorney opinion on Maritime Forest settlement. Sullivan’s Island Town Council has decided to get an opinion from a Greenville attorney about the legal path forward in their Maritime Forest settlement. More: WCSC TV

To get dozens of South Carolina news stories every business day, contact the folks at SC Clips.

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