Trademark Attorney in Summerville SC

If you are a successful business owner, protecting your intellectual property rights is one of the most important steps that you can take to safeguard your company. Often, hiring a trademark attorney in Summerville to register a trademark is an arduous process that results in outrageous hourly fees and complicated paperwork.

At Sausser Summers, PC, our goal is to make the trademark registration process as straightforward and cost-effective as possible, so that you can focus on growing your business while we take the necessary steps to protect what you have worked so hard to build.

Unlike other law firms, Sausser Summers, PC provides flat fee trademark services at an affordable price. Our goal is to eliminate the uncertainty that comes with hourly work, so you know exactly how much your total expenses will be at the outset of our relationship.

With a BBB A+ rating, we are consistently ranked as one of the top trademark law firms in the U.S. We aim to provide you with the same five-star service that you would receive from large firms, with a modern twist at a rate that won’t break the bank.

How Sausser Summers, PC Flat Fee Trademark Service Works

Our flat fee trademark process is simple, streamlined, and consists of three steps:

  1. Choose your trademark service and provide us with information about your trademark through our online questionnaire. Once this is complete, you will pay the flat fee for us to move forward.
  2. Our trademark lawyers in Summerville will conduct an extensive search to make sure you are in the clear to register your trademark. Once our search has concluded, we will send you a legal opinion letter informing you of our search results.
  3. Our trademark attorneys will file your trademark and provide updates throughout the registration process.

Our three-step process lets you:

  1. Work one-on-one with an experienced trademark attorney in Summerville who will consult with you at your convenience.
  2. Save your hard-earned money with our flat fee trademark services.
  3. Gain access to a licensed trademark attorney who will file your trademark application.
  4. Get updates on your trademark application as it moves through the registration process.
  5. Focus on running your business while Sausser Summers, PC handles the hard work. No headaches, no hidden fees, no tricks.

Trademark Services at a Glance

Whether you need help maintaining your current trademark or require assistance canceling an abandoned mark, Sausser Summers, PC is here to help. Here are just a few of the trademark services that we provide to clients:

Comprehensive Trademark Search – For many entrepreneurs, this is the first and most crucial step to take when it’s time to safeguard your business and intellectual property. Your trademark attorney in Summerville will conduct a thorough search of the USPTO Federal Trademark Database and each U.S state’s trademark database. We will also perform a trademark domain name search and a trademark common law search on your behalf. We will follow up with a 30-minute phone call, where we will discuss the results of our trademark search and send you a drafted legal opinion letter.

U.S. Trademark Filing – Once your trademark lawyer in Summerville has completed a comprehensive trademark search, the next step is to file a trademark application. We will submit your application within 1-3 business days and keep you updated on its USPTO status throughout the registration process.
U.S Trademark Office Actions – These actions are essentially initial rejections of your trademark by the USPTO. Applicants have six months in which to respond to this rejection. For a flat fee, your trademark lawyer from Sausser Summers, PC will compose a response on your behalf so that you may continue to focus on your day-to-day business tasks.

U.S Trademark Renewal – If you already own a trademark, Sausser Summers, PC will renew your registered trademark so that it remains current. Extended protection varies depending on how long you have held your trademark. We encourage you to visit our U.S Trademark Renewal page to find out which renewal service best fits your current situation.

U.S. Trademark Cease & Desist – Whether you have been accused of infringing on someone’s trademark and received a cease and desist letter or have found an infringer on your own mark, it is imperative that you respond. If you have received a letter and do not respond, you might be sued. If you find an infringer and do not demand that they stop, you may lose your trademark rights. To discuss the best course of action for your situation, we recommend you contact Sausser Summers, PC, for a risk-free consultation at no additional cost. Once you speak directly to one of our attorneys, we will send your cease and desist letter or respond to the one you have received for an affordable flat fee.

Statement of Use – If you plan on using your mark in commerce, you must file a Statement of Use to notify the USPTO. This filing must take place six months after you receive your Notice of Allowance. For an affordable flat-rate fee, your trademark attorney in Summerville will make any requisite filings on your behalf. Before you decide on a course of action, we encourage you to contact our office at (843) 654-0078 to speak with one of our attorneys. This consultation will help us get a better understanding of your situation and is always free and confidential.

Additional U.S Trademark Attorney Services

In addition to the services listed above, we also help our clients enforce their trademarks, monitor trademark filings, and even help protect business owners from trademark infringement on platforms like Amazon and Etsy.
Have questions about our flat-fee trademark services? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your earliest convenience, so that you can preserve the one asset that sets you apart from everyone else: your name.

Latest News in Summerville

SC communities to receive part of $26 billion opioid settlement tied to epidemic

A preliminary $26 billion settlement was announced July 21 with Johnson & Johnson and the nation’s “Big Three” opioid distributors: AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson. If approved, many South Carolina communities could receive payments as early as the first quarter of 2022 and together would reap as much as $350 million from the drugmakers over the next two decades. The settlement includes 3,795 communities across the country within 48 states that the opioid epidemic has impacted. Fifty-four o...

A preliminary $26 billion settlement was announced July 21 with Johnson & Johnson and the nation’s “Big Three” opioid distributors: AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson.

If approved, many South Carolina communities could receive payments as early as the first quarter of 2022 and together would reap as much as $350 million from the drugmakers over the next two decades.

The settlement includes 3,795 communities across the country within 48 states that the opioid epidemic has impacted. Fifty-four of those 3,795 communities are from South Carolina, including Charleston, Berkeley and Dorchester counties. The settlement also includes the city of Charleston, North Charleston, Mount Pleasant and Summerville individually.

Joe Rice, co-founder of the Mount Pleasant law firm Motley Rice LLC, was a lead counsel for negotiations in dividing the settlement among these communities.

Rice and other counsel wanted to create a settlement that could be accepted by different local governments and would work for all of the affected communities, he wrote in a July 21 blog post.

“The agreement announced today isn’t perfect, but it is a way to provide assistance to states and subdivisions if they agree to the settlement, as well as changes in conduct for these companies regarding their handling of prescription narcotics,” Rice wrote.

The opioid distributors were accused of ignoring red flags and failing their duty to report suspicious orders and the foreseeable black market of addictive opioid drugs.

AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson have agreed to pay a total settlement amount of $21 billion over 18 years. Through the settlement, the companies would not admit any wrongdoing.

“The distributors may not admit to any wrongdoing, but they agreed to pay $21 billion,” Rice said. “You tell me if you think they’re just being generous.”

Johnson & Johnson will pay $5 billion over seven years, Rice said. The company also agreed to exit the opioid business, he said.

Rice said he supported the settlement.

“The important thing is, with the settlement, the money starts now,” Rice said. “And we need the money now. In delaying the money two to three years while trying to get a trial date, the problem is going to be so much worse. These cases are not guaranteed winners, and they are also extremely expensive.”

The settlement is subject to change and could even be scrapped altogether. States have until Aug. 21 to decide whether they will participate in the settlements. The pharmaceutical companies then have 14 days to each determine if they will proceed with the payment.

If the pharmaceutical companies proceed with the settlement, the 3,795 communities each have 120 days to decide whether they will participate in receiving their portion of the settlement. From there, the participating states and pharmaceutical companies must reaffirm their decision to proceed with the settlement.

If all communities in South Carolina were to accept the settlement, the state would receive approximately $350 million over the next two decades, Rice said. For all settlement recipients, 85 percent of the funds are restricted to abating the opioid epidemic.

“You can’t look at this as to what a small community is going to get,” he said. “These epidemics don’t stay within their zip code. We need help uniformly statewide.”

In the settlement, the companies also agree to significantly change their business operations regarding how narcotics are handled, tracked and analyzed, Rice wrote.

The settlement comes after drug dose deaths between May 2019 and 2020 increased more than 20 percent in South Carolina, according to the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control. Synthetic opioid deaths, in particular, increased about 38 percent from June 2019 to May 2020.

The increases in drug overdose deaths appear to have accelerated during the COVID-19 pandemic, DHEC reported.

“Now, as recently confirmed by new data from the CDC, we have an opioid crisis compounded by a global pandemic, so timing is critical to get assistance to our communities,” Rice wrote in his blog post.

Aside from the settlement, other cases continue against other opioid industry defendants, including pharmacies. This proposed settlement does not resolve these cases working through the court system.

In a separate announcement, the American Medical Association urged advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a letter dated July 16 to overhaul the CDC’s current guidelines on opioid prescriptions.

The AMA holds that current restrictions are “devastating for patients with pain” and have harmed those who suffer from cancer, sickle cell disease and other painful conditions. The group also pointed out that the nation’s current opioid epidemic is no longer being driven by prescriptions, but instead by “heroin and illicitly manufactured fentanyl, fentanyl analogs, and stimulants.”

PPP Loans Benefited Summerville Businesses

SUMMERVILLE, SC — Applications for the federal Paycheck Protection Program have closed after benefiting more than 11.8 million pandemic-stricken businesses, including many in Summerville. The Paycheck Protection Program started in April 2020 as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES), and was extended until May 31, 2021. There were 90,624 PPP loans approved in South Carolina in 2021 alone, according to the Small Business Administration. The total 2021 amount approved was $3,058,629,335. ...

SUMMERVILLE, SC — Applications for the federal Paycheck Protection Program have closed after benefiting more than 11.8 million pandemic-stricken businesses, including many in Summerville.

The Paycheck Protection Program started in April 2020 as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES), and was extended until May 31, 2021.

There were 90,624 PPP loans approved in South Carolina in 2021 alone, according to the Small Business Administration. The total 2021 amount approved was $3,058,629,335.

Loan applications were processed through banks and other traditional lenders, with the SBA backing the resulting loans. Around $800 billion in loans were approved nationwide under the program.

The loans are forgivable if borrowers meet certain criteria, including spending at least 60 percent of the money on payroll costs and maintaining employee compensation levels.

Below are some Summerville businesses that benefited from the program according to the SBA. Check here for a full, searchable database.

SCOUT BOATS, INC.

SPORTSMAN BOATS MANUFACTURING, INC.

KNIGHT'S COMPANIES, INC.

SWEETGRASS PEDIATRICS LLC

MCELVEEN BUICK-GMC, INC.

ORIGIN POINT BRANDS, LLC

CHARLESTON GASTROENTEROLOGY SPECIALISTS, PA

AFFINITY HEALTHCARE SOLUTIONS LLC

HOOVER AUTOMOTIVE, LLC

SUMMERVILLE AUTO LLC

Nationally, the accommodation/food service industry received the largest share of loans in 2021, with 15 percent of the total.

Around 87 percent of the loans approved in 2021 were for $50,000 or less, and they accounted for a third of the total approved amount. The average loan size was $42,000.

The program wasn't without controversy. Banks tended to prioritize large, established businesses, according to a New York Times analysis. Congress raised fees for small loans in December to encourage lenders to make small business loans, and rules were changed in February to allow unprofitable solo businesses to qualify.

Several large companies drew public ire after it was revealed that they took PPP loans instead of relying on traditional capital-raising activities. The outcry prompted the SBA to review all loan applications over $2 million and issue guidance that the program was intended for businesses that lacked access to other cash-raising methods.

Editor's note: This list was automatically generated using data from the SBA for approved loans of $150,000 or more, although some loans ultimately were not made. Business owners can contact the SBA if information about a loan isn't correct. SBA data occasionally contains duplicate entries. Other feedback can be sent to content@patch.com.

Local gun shop instructor concerned new open carry law will catch people off guard

COLUMBIA, S.C. (WCIV) — “It changes radically on August 15, so what are we going to do," said William Hayes, who is a concealed weapons permit class instructor at ATP gun shop in Summerville. August 15 is the date the Open Carry With Training Law goes into effect in South Carolina. Hayes says not many business owners he has spoken to are aw...

COLUMBIA, S.C. (WCIV) — “It changes radically on August 15, so what are we going to do," said William Hayes, who is a concealed weapons permit class instructor at ATP gun shop in Summerville.

August 15 is the date the Open Carry With Training Law goes into effect in South Carolina. Hayes says not many business owners he has spoken to are aware of that.

“When I ask the managers about open carry, which becomes law on August 15, none of them know it’s coming. They all look at me like, what?" he said.

The bill will allow for people with CWP licenses to openly carry a firearm in most situations. Hayes is concerned that when people start walking into businesses across the state with a gun visibly showing, it could cause confrontation.

Berkeley and Charleston County representative JA Moore says that potential problem shows why the law shouldn't have been passed in the first place.

“We have crumbling infrastructure, unclean water, and now what we’re going to have in less than a month now is individuals being able to openly carry a firearm, like we’re living in the wild west," said Moore.

In an effort to stop confrontations from happening, new de-escalation training will be required for people getting CWP licenses, but Hayes says instructors like him will only have eight hours to teach them, when it usually takes two days.

“De-escalation is not easy to teach. You can teach de-escalation by just telling them, this is what you do to de-escalate but the unfortunate thing is that some people’s view of de-escalation is shoot hem first, before they shoot you," said Hayes.

GOP state Senator Larry Grooms, who has sponsored multiple open carry laws over the years, says more firearms will actually lead to less confrontation.

“I fall on the side that having open carry will probably lessen he chance of confrontation. The ones you have to worry about aren’t the ones who obey they law, that would be the ones who have gone through training and have background checks to open carry. It’s the criminals that you have to worry about. When the criminals know that there are more folks carrying weapons, they’re probably less like to use theirs," said Grooms.

Regardless of where you fall on the issue, Hayes says getting out more information on it is what's most important.

If you want to read the full law, you can see it here.

Summerville fall youth sports registration opens

Registration for Summerville Parks and Recreation Fall 2021 youth sports programs runs through Aug. 1. The town has opened registration for its Youth flag football, tee ball, baseball and soccer Fall seasons. All programs are coed. Registration for all programs is available at the Town of Summerville Parks and Recreation Office located at 301 North Hickory Street from 8:30 a.m. until 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. Saturdays and from noon until 6 p.m. Sundays as well as by appointment only at the Gahag...

Registration for Summerville Parks and Recreation Fall 2021 youth sports programs runs through Aug. 1.

The town has opened registration for its Youth flag football, tee ball, baseball and soccer Fall seasons. All programs are coed.

Registration for all programs is available at the Town of Summerville Parks and Recreation Office located at 301 North Hickory Street from 8:30 a.m. until 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. Saturdays and from noon until 6 p.m. Sundays as well as by appointment only at the Gahagan Park Office at 515 West Boundary Street. Online registration is available at https://secure.rec1.com/SC/summerville-sc/catalog.

The registration fee is $45 for Summerville residents and $65 for non-residents. A $10 late fee will be added starting Aug. 2. Forms of payment accepted include cash, check and credit cards.

A birth certificate or military ID, proof of residency and proof of medical insurance are required to register.

Practices for all Fall programs will start in August. Games will be played evenings Monday through Thursday and/or Saturday mornings in mid-September and October at the Jerry Blackwell Sports Complex at Gahagan Park with the one exception being the town’s 10U baseball teams that compete at a different local facility.

Each Fall program has its own age groups and equipment requirements, but none allow the use of metal cleats for any age group.

Youth flag football age groups are: 5U (4-5), 7U (6-7) 9U (8-9), 11U (10-11) and 14U (12-14). Participants must provide their own mouthpiece and “no pocket” pants. Participants will receive a game jersey. Teams will be furnished with footballs, flags and other necessary equipment.

Youth baseball age groups are: Tee Ball 4U (3-4) and 6U (5-6), Coach Pitch 8U (7-8), and Baseball 10U (9-10). Participants must provide their own grey baseball pants and a glove. Participants for the 8U and 10U groups must provide their own batting helmet with a mask.

Baseball players will receive a game jersey and a cap. Teams will be furnished with bats, balls and tees. Catcher gear will be supplied for 8-10 group.

Youth soccer age groups are: 4U (3-4), 6U (5-6), 8U (7-8) and 10U (9-10). Participants must provide their shin guards and “no pocket” pants. Participants will receive a game jersey and socks. Teams will be furnished with additional soccer balls, cones, and other equipment.

SC Commission on Disabilities and Special Needs to improve safety, accountability at care facilities – Florence, South Carolina

Florence, South Carolina 2021-07-16 07:27:26 – Columbia, South Carolina (WBTW) —The South Carolina Commission on Disability and Special Needs unanimously voted Thursday to explain safety at five regional intermediate care facilities in the state (commonly referred to as DDSN Regional). He supported the agency’s progressive plans to improve accountability and workplace training. Center. The DDSN Regional Center Intermediate Care Facility is operated by the state and 24-hour care, supervision, and treatment...

Florence, South Carolina 2021-07-16 07:27:26 –

Columbia, South Carolina (WBTW) —The South Carolina Commission on Disability and Special Needs unanimously voted Thursday to explain safety at five regional intermediate care facilities in the state (commonly referred to as DDSN Regional). He supported the agency’s progressive plans to improve accountability and workplace training. Center.

The DDSN Regional Center Intermediate Care Facility is operated by the state and
24-hour care, supervision, and treatment for the most vulnerable individuals serviced by DDSN.

Regional centers in Clinton, Colombia, Florence, Hartsville, and Summerville are generally recommended only if all other suitable home and community-based services do not ideally fit the needs and circumstances of the family.

At a committee meeting on Thursday, DDSN announced that it had signed a memorandum of understanding with the SC’s Aging Department, which operates the South Carolina Long-Term Care Ombudsman Office.

Under the contract, LTCO will create training video content that DDSN will use to better train its direct care staff throughout the onboarding process and throughout the year. DDSN hopes that this training will help eliminate cases of abuse and neglect and improve the overall quality of care for all residents, especially those with growing behavioral needs.

“The pandemic poses a very difficult staffing challenge at the ICF, and the stress on the workforce of Direct Support Professionals (DSPs) due to high turnover, staff shortages and overtime is immeasurable.” And Constance Holloway, Esq, the interim mayor of DDSN. Says. Said. “As a result of increased data collection, monitoring and input from supervisors and frontline workers, DDSN aims to increase worker satisfaction and quality of life for those working in the state’s five regional intermediate care facilities. We are developing a series of new initiatives and stronger guidance. ”

DDSN Committee Chairman Stephanie Rawlinson and other members fully support the initiative to strengthen the workforce of regional centers and strengthen efforts to protect the health and safety of all residents. Was expressed.

“This committee has no tolerance for cases of abuse in regional centers. The new training offered by LTCO is welcomed and is a government agency that promotes positive change across DDSN. We are confirming our efforts, “said Rawlinson.

A task force for ICF reform and improvement was also established and members were appointed during the committee’s meetings. Other new initiatives include the resurrection of the regional center family council throughout the state. This allows DDSN to regularly gather opinions from self-advocates and family members and establish open communication.

“Families act as an important fidelity check for our standard treatments at regional centers. By restructuring state-wide families and parent groups, DDSN focuses on common concerns at the centers. , You can get ideas for improving the lives of the families we serve, “says Holloway.

SC Commission on Disabilities and Special Needs to improve safety, accountability at care facilities Source link SC Commission on Disabilities and Special Needs to improve safety, accountability at care facilities

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