Trademark Attorney in West Ashley, SC

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At Sausser Summers, PC, our goal is to make the trademark registration process as straightforward and cost-effective as possible, so that you can focus on growing your business while we take the necessary steps to protect what you have worked so hard to build.

Unlike other law firms, Sausser Summers, PC provides flat fee trademark services at an affordable price. Our goal is to eliminate the uncertainty that comes with hourly work, so you know exactly how much your total expenses will be at the outset of our relationship.

With a BBB A+ rating, we are consistently ranked as one of the top trademark law firms in the U.S. We aim to provide you with the same five-star service that you would receive from large firms, with a modern twist at a rate that won’t break the bank.

Service Areas

How Sausser Summers, PC Flat Fee Trademark Service Works

Our flat fee trademark process is simple, streamlined, and consists of three steps:

Our three-step process lets you:

Trademark Services at a Glance

Whether you need help maintaining your current trademark or require assistance canceling an abandoned mark, Sausser Summers, PC is here to help. Here are just a few of the trademark services that we provide to clients:

Comprehensive Trademark Search

For many entrepreneurs, this is the first and most crucial step to take when it’s time to safeguard your business and intellectual property. Your trademark attorney in West Ashley will conduct a thorough search of the USPTO Federal Trademark Database and each U.S state’s trademark database. We will also perform a trademark domain name search and a trademark common law search on your behalf. We will follow up with a 30-minute phone call, where we will discuss the results of our trademark search and send you a drafted legal opinion letter.

U.S. Trademark Filing

Once your trademark lawyer in West Ashley has completed a comprehensive trademark search, the next step is to file a trademark application. We will submit your application within 1-3 business days and keep you updated on its USPTO status throughout the registration process.

U.S Trademark Office Actions – These actions are essentially initial rejections of your trademark by the USPTO. Applicants have six months in which to respond to this rejection. For a flat fee, your trademark lawyer from Sausser Summers, PC will compose

U.S Trademark Renewal

If you already own a trademark, Sausser Summers, PC will renew your registered trademark so that it remains current. Extended protection varies depending on how long you have held your trademark. We encourage you to visit our U.S Trademark Renewal page to find out which renewal service best fits your current situation.

U.S. Trademark Cease & Desist

Whether you have been accused of infringing on someone’s trademark and received a cease and desist letter or have found an infringer on your own mark, it is imperative that you respond. If you have received a letter and do not respond, you might be sued. If you find an infringer and do not demand that they stop, you may lose your trademark rights. To discuss the best course of action for your situation, we recommend you contact Sausser Summers, PC, for a risk-free consultation at no additional cost. Once you speak directly to one of our attorneys, we will send your cease and desist letter or respond to the one you have received for an affordable flat fee.

Statement of Use

If you plan on using your mark in commerce, you must file a Statement of Use to notify the USPTO. This filing must take place six months after you receive your Notice of Allowance. For an affordable flat-rate fee, your trademark attorney in West Ashley will make any requisite filings on your behalf. Before you decide on a course of action, we encourage you to contact our office at (843) 654-0078 to speak with one of our attorneys. This consultation will help us get a better understanding of your situation and is always free and confidential.

U.S. Trademark Filing of Name and Logo

I Have a Word Mark & Logo!

*USPTO filing fee of $250 for one international class is included, as mentioned above. Additional fees will apply if multiple classes. If you have any questions about the total cost please contact us prior to submitting this form.

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Latest News in West Ashley

New retailer coming to empty big box in Charleston; new West Ashley restaurant debuts soon

A large retail space in a West Ashley shopping center left vacant by one clothing store will soon be occupied by another soft-goods retailer.New Jersey-based Burlington plans to move into the 37,000-square-foot space vacated last year by the bankrupt Stein Mart in St. Andrews Center at 975 Savannah Highway, according to construction documents.Jericho, N.Y.-based Kimco Realty, which owns St. Andrews Center, also lists Burlington as the new tenant.An openi...

A large retail space in a West Ashley shopping center left vacant by one clothing store will soon be occupied by another soft-goods retailer.

New Jersey-based Burlington plans to move into the 37,000-square-foot space vacated last year by the bankrupt Stein Mart in St. Andrews Center at 975 Savannah Highway, according to construction documents.

Jericho, N.Y.-based Kimco Realty, which owns St. Andrews Center, also lists Burlington as the new tenant.

An opening date has not been announced, but the retailer is not expected to welcome customers until fall 2021 or winter 2022.

The space being occupied by Burlington is the second largest in the shopping center. Harris Teeter anchors the retail site with a 52,334-square-foot supermarket.

Mid-size tenants in the center include Petco, West Marine and Tuesday Morning. A 4,800-square-foot space vacated by toy store Wonder Works in early 2020 is the only remaining available space in the retail complex.

Burlington, formerly called Burlington Coat Factory, has another store in the region at 2150 Northwoods Blvd. in the former Sears store at Northwoods Mall in North Charleston. It opened in 2018.

The clothing chain has five other locations in South Carolina, including two in Columbia and one each in Florence, Indian Land and North Myrtle Beach.

Representatives of Burlington and Kimco did not respond to requests for comment.

Jacksonville-based Stein Mart filed for bankruptcy in August 2020 and shuttered all of its stores. Miami-based Retail Ecommerce Ventures bought the intellectual rights to the company and recently launched an online-only platform.

What’s cooking?

Also at St. Andrews Center, the 2,105-square-foot space formerly occupied by Hubee D’s restaurant in an outparcel building will soon become a new dining spot.

Work on Chipotle Mexican Grill, next to The Joint Chiropractic, is expected to wrap up by Feb. 11. An opening date has not been announced, but the restaurant could be open by March.

It will be the Newport Beach, Calif.-based chain’s sixth location in the Charleston area and its 27th in South Carolina.

Lighting up

A new tobacco-based shop is opening soon in downtown Charleston.

Cigar Row Events will celebrate its grand opening Feb. 13-14 in the Great Hall of the Charleston City Market.

Retired schoolteachers Deidre Garrard and Holly Stilley bought the cigar rolling-event business 4½ years ago through what they termed “a leap of faith.”

To get started, they called on event planners and businesses related to the wedding industry and corporate functions. They also infused cigars with bourbon and craft beer to create different tastings and took their products to private events and festivals throughout the country.

In 2017, the two hand-rolled cigars to try out for the Charleston Night Market before being invited to the Day Market. They then joined the list of temporary vendors waiting for a more permanent space and recently landed a spot where a glassware vendor operated for several years before the owners retired.

“What usually takes 15 or more years has happened for our little business in just four years,” Garrard said. “We are now permanent vendors in the Great Hall of the City Market.”

Cigar Row Events is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day.

Rising moon

A North Charleston-based lifestyle retail chain that got its start as a mall kiosk soon will add two stores to its expanding Southeast footprint.

Palmetto Moon plans to launch a new store in Tanger Outlets in Sevierville, Tenn., near Pigeon Forge, on Feb. 26 and its first location in Alabama, in Hoover south of Birmingham, in April.

After venturing into the collegiate merchandise business as a small unfixed retailer in Citadel Mall in 2002, Palmetto Moon expanded over the years and now operates 26 stores in five Southeastern states, including 11 in South Carolina.

In the Charleston area, two are in North Charleston and one each can be found in Mount Pleasant and Summerville. The two new stores opening this spring will bring its count to 28 locations. Others are in the works to open later this year.

Young apprentices get hands-on training

Nine of the newest staff members learning the ropes at MUSC Health are either still in high school or have just graduated.They’re part of a youth apprenticeship program facilitated by Trident Technical College that combines academics with paid hands-on learning, and director of nursing excellence Kara Simpson, DNP, R.N., has high hopes for their futures.“Our goal is to make sure these apprentices have such a wonderful experience that when they graduate high school, they stay with us as patient care techs while in co...

Nine of the newest staff members learning the ropes at MUSC Health are either still in high school or have just graduated.

They’re part of a youth apprenticeship program facilitated by Trident Technical College that combines academics with paid hands-on learning, and director of nursing excellence Kara Simpson, DNP, R.N., has high hopes for their futures.

“Our goal is to make sure these apprentices have such a wonderful experience that when they graduate high school, they stay with us as patient care techs while in college, and once they graduate nursing school, they stay at MUSC as R.N.s,” she said. “It's really a pipeline of talent for us and building that workforce of the future.”

The Charleston Regional Youth Apprentice program began in 2014 with just one pathway – industrial mechanics – and six employers. Today there are 18 pathways, ranging from culinary arts to cybersecurity, and more than 160 employer-partners.

The CNA/pre-nursing pathway, added in 2017, is one of the most competitive, said Ellen Kaufman, Trident Tech youth apprenticeship coordinator. Students commit to two years of apprenticeship. During this time, they’ll complete both the certified nursing assistant (CNA) and patient care technician (PCT) coursework at Trident Tech as well as required academic courses.

“It's a really great program, especially if you know you want to go into nursing. It gets you experience really early on, right off the bat." Shea Held apprentice

Back at the beginning of the year, Simpson decided how many apprentices the hospital could take on and sent that information to Trident Tech. At the same time, at West Ashley High School, senior Shea Held was working with her guidance counselor to gather materials for her application to the program.

Held said she’s always wanted to go into nursing, and she was eager for the experience that the apprenticeship program would provide.

“It's a really great program, especially if you know you want to go into nursing,” she said. “It gets you experience really early on, right off the bat, and you learn so much more in the hospital than you do in the PCT classes and the courses.”

Once Held’s application was selected for the next round, she went in for an interview at Trident Tech. The Trident Tech staff then sent all the videotaped student interviews to the participating hospitals in town.

At MUSC Health, Simpson, program coordinator Robin Smith and unit nursing managers scrutinized the video interviews and identified the students they wanted to hire. Their counterparts at other local hospitals were doing the same. The determination of which student ends up at which hospital comes down to a draft day, when the hospitals take turns selecting the students they want as apprentices.

Simpson is happy with how this year turned out.

“We got a really strong crew,” she said.

The students were assigned to various units, where they’ll remain for their two years. They are paid employees, but their managers schedule them around their school schedules. For Held, that means she currently works a 3:30-11 p.m. shift on Mondays and Fridays.

She’s assigned to a Digestive Disease Center floor in Ashley River Tower. Under the supervision of an experienced PCT, she’s taken a patient’s vital signs, helped people get up, prepared rooms, changed linens and emptied catheter and ostomy bags.

“She’s awesome,” said her preceptor, or trainer, Jaime Edwards. “She’s ambitious. She’s a good kid.”

In all of the pathways, the apprentices must put in 2,000 hours of work and have a core list of tasks they must complete to qualify for certification from the U.S. Department of Labor.

Held is eager to put her new classroom skills to work in the hospital. She’s also finding that there are some things that class can’t really prepare you for.

“They don’t prepare you for how patients are going to treat you. That is a big thing,” she said. “You don’t really come in contact with a lot of mean people, but there are some people who are having a rough day, and they don’t really prepare you for that. It’s just something you learn.”

Luckily, with her background working in the local food and beverage industry, Held has plenty of experience soothing unhappy customers.

“Most of them are scared,” she said. “They just want to know what’s going on.”

“I can see this program expanding. My goal would be to have an apprentice in every unit.” Kara Simpson, DNP, R.N. director of nursing excellence

Simpson said that type of on-the-ground training is helpful for young people deciding on a career.

“It’s a good eye-opener for the apprentices to get a feel for, ‘Do I really want to go to college for this when I get done with high school?” she said.

And it’s a great program for the hospital as it seeks to develop more pipelines into health care professions.

“I can see this program expanding,” Simpson said. “My goal would be to have an apprentice in every unit.”

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Red Cross: Blood supply remains at lowest post-summer level in 6 years

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — There continues to be a critical need for blood and platelet donations as fall continues.On Monday, the American Red Cross shared that the blood supply has been at its lowest post-summer level since 2015, causing the organization to enter its third week of an emergency blood and platelet shortage."Fall is typically a time when the blood supply rebounds from summer blood shortages, but a surge in COVID-19 cases across the U.S. due to the delta variant has contributed to the lowest donor turno...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — There continues to be a critical need for blood and platelet donations as fall continues.

On Monday, the American Red Cross shared that the blood supply has been at its lowest post-summer level since 2015, causing the organization to enter its third week of an emergency blood and platelet shortage.

"Fall is typically a time when the blood supply rebounds from summer blood shortages, but a surge in COVID-19 cases across the U.S. due to the delta variant has contributed to the lowest donor turnout of the year. To shore up inventory, the Red Cross must collect 10,000 additional blood products each week this month to meet hospital and patient needs," a press release explained.

In recent weeks, the Red Cross has had less than a day's supply of certain blood types, and donors are urgently needed to replenish these vital resources.

While supplies last, those who donate in October will be emailed a link to claim a free Zaxby’s Signature Sandwich reward or will be given a $5 e-gift card to a merchant of their choice. Additionally, those who donate from Oct. 11-31 will receive a bonus $5 e-gift card to a shop of their choosing.

ABC News 4 is hosting a blood drive on Thursday, Oct. 14th. The drive will be open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Northwoods Mall and from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the Citadel Mall.

Other blood donation opportunities around the Lowcountry are listed below:

Berkeley County

Charleston

Cross

Goose Creek

Moncks Corner

_______________

Charleston County

Kiawah Island

Mount Pleasant

North Charleston

_______________

Colleton County

Edisto Island

_______________

Dorchester County

North Charleston

Summerville

To learn more about giving blood through the American Red Cross, click here.

3 Charleston-area teams take second in state boys swim championships

NORTH CHARLESTON - Monday was devoted to the boys as the S.C. High School League held its state swimming championship at the North Charleston Aquatic Center. The girls state champions were crowned on Saturday.Three local schools came away as state runner-up in their respective classifications.Oceanside Collegiate finished as the runner-up in Class AAA, the highest finish in school history. The Landsharks finished with 369 points, behind the champion St. Joseph’s Catholic (386.50). Bishop England finished in third with 347...

NORTH CHARLESTON - Monday was devoted to the boys as the S.C. High School League held its state swimming championship at the North Charleston Aquatic Center. The girls state champions were crowned on Saturday.

Three local schools came away as state runner-up in their respective classifications.

Oceanside Collegiate finished as the runner-up in Class AAA, the highest finish in school history. The Landsharks finished with 369 points, behind the champion St. Joseph’s Catholic (386.50). Bishop England finished in third with 347 points.

Oceanside did not have an individual champion or relay champion on the day but piled up points with depth. Landon Duffie earned a silver medal in the 100 butterfly, while Andres Aristimuno took third in the 50 freestyle and fourth in the 100 freestyle. Jackson Storm was fourth in the 50 and Gabe Grimm finished sixth in the 100-breaststroke.

“I think everyone came in knowing we had a chance,” oca coach Courtney Beauch said. “I’m very happy with how we placed. When we won region for the first time, we felt like we had a chance today. If you have enough people, you can do very well if everyone does what they are capable of doing.”

Bishop England won state titles in the 200 medley relay and the 400 freestyle relay. Owen Fritts took third in the 200 individual medley and third in the 100-breaststroke. Justin Hafner was third in the 500 freestyle and fourth in the 200 freestyle. Matthew Picard was second in the 200 freestyle and fourth in the 100 breaststroke.

Academic Magnet’s Kyle Hertwig won the state title in the 50 freestyle and was third in the 100 freestyle. Teammate Jack Troy was the state champion in the 500 freestyle and finished second in the 100 backstroke.

Academic Magnet finished eighth in the team standings. Philip Simmons was 13th, Hanahan was 16th and Charleston Charter was 19th.

Lucy Beckham was the state runner-up in Class AAAA with 285 points. Eastside won its sixth consecutive state championship with a state record 603.50 points.

Lucy Beckham’s 400 relay team took a silver medal. The top individual performer was Stephen Russell, who finished third in the 100 freestyle and fourth in the 200 freestyle. Colby Schleier finished fourth in the 100 backstroke.

“We are still a young team, a young program, so this is a great day for the program,” Lucy Beckham coach Zach Parker said. “We have a long way to go, but today was a great start. I think winning was a little out of our reach this year so we set a goal to finish second.”

James Island’s Luke Nixon won the 500 freestyle and was second in the 200. Teammate Wells Cloud was second in both the 100 butterfly and 100 backstroke. James Island was 11th in the team standings,

Wando barely missed hoisting the first-place trophy, falling four points (314-310) short of champion J.L. Mann in the Class AAAAA meet. J.L. Mann won its third consecutive state title while Wando was state runner-up for the second straight year.

“You know, we brought six boys here today, so to finish second in the state with six boys, I am not going to complain,” Wando coach Cheryl Durden said. “Unfortunately, we had a disqualification, which didn’t help us. But I am so proud of their effort today. They really did a great job.”

Wando’s William Slowey took second in the 200-yard individual medley, while teammate Charles Green was second in the 500 freestyle and second in the 100-yard backstroke.

West Ashley’s Carson Owens finished third in the 200-yard freestyle.

Ashley Ridge placed 14th in the team standings, followed by West Ashley (15th), Summerville (16th), Fort Dorchester (19th) and Stratford (26th).

2021 SCHSL state swim medalists

Girls

Class AAA

200 medley relay – 1. Oceanside, 3. Bishop England

200 freestyle – 3. Clare Natale, Oceanside

200 IM – 1. Kendal Chunn, Oceanside, 3. Lindsay Burbage, Bishop England

50 freestyle – 1. Nell Cagle, Oceanside, 3. Caroline Hill, Oceanside

100 butterfly – 1. Jill Smiley, Bishop England, 3. Caroline Hill, Oceanside

100 freestyle – 3. Anna Albert, Oceanside

200 relay – 2. Oceanside

100 backstroke – 1. Kendal Chunn, Oceanside

100 breaststroke – 2. Nell Cagle, Oceanside, 3. Lindsay Burbage, Bishop England

400 relay – 1. Oceanside, 3. Academic Magnet

Class AAAA

200 medley relay – 3. Lucy Beckham

200 IM – 2. Adair Shaw, Lucy Beckham

100 butterfly – 1. Katie Grace Vandergrift, Lucy Beckham, 2. Adair Shaw, Lucy Beckham

200 backstroke – 2. Addie King, Lucy Beckham, 3. Emma Durham, James Island

400 relay – 2. Lucy Beckham

Class AAAAA

200 medley relay – 1. Wando

200 IM – 2. Mary Shaw, Wando

50 freestyle – 1. Cassidy Lima, Summerville, 3. Madelyn Routhier, Fort Dorchester

100 freestyle – 1. Cassidy Lima, Summerville

100 butterfly – 1. Madelyn Routhier, Fort Dorchester, 2. Sophia Frece, Wando, 3.Illyanna Lightfoot, Wando

100 backstroke – 1. Sophia Frece, Wando, 2. Caitlin Mason, Wando

100 breaststroke – 1. Mary Shaw, Wando

400 relay – 1. Wando

Boys

AAA

200 medley relay – 1. Bishop England, 3. Academic Magnet

200 IM – 3. Owen Fritts, Bishop England

200 freestyle – 2. Matthew Picard, Bishop England

50 freestyle – 1. Kyle Hertwig, Academic Magnet, 3. Andres Aristimuno, Oceanside

100 freestyle – 3. Kyle Hertwig, Academic Magnet

500 freestyle – 1. Jack Troy, Academic Magnet, 3. Justin Hafner, Bishop England

200 relay – 3. Oceanside

100 backstroke – 2. Jack Troy, Academic Magnet

100 breaststroke – 3. Owen Fritts, Bishop England

400 relay – 1. Bishop England

AAAA

200 freestyle – 2. Luke Nixon, James Island

500 freestyle - 1. Luke Nixon, James Island

100 butterfly – 2. Wells Cloud, James Island

100 backstroke – 2. Wells Cloud, James Island

100 freestyle – 3. Stephen Russell, Lucy Beckham

400 relay – 2. Lucy Beckham

AAAAA

200 medley relay – 1. Wando

200 freestyle relay – 2. Wando

200 freestyle – 3. Carson Owens, West Ashley

200 IM – 2. William Slowey, Wando

50 freestyle – 3. Parker Azevedo, Summerville

500 freestyle – 2. Charles Green, Wando

100 backstroke – 2. Charles Green, Wando, 3. Jacob Hills, Wando

CCSD board extends mask mandate; district offers testing to all students and staff

Charleston County School District is extending its mask requirement by 30 days, meaning all students, staff and visitors will be required to wear masks in its schools until at least Nov. 12.The board of trustees voted 8-1 to move back the expiration date at an Oct. 11 meeting. The mandate was originally supposed to end on Oct. 15.The district started enforcing the mandate last month, saying students who refused to wear a mask or did not have a religious or medical exemption would have to learn virtually. The decision sparked se...

Charleston County School District is extending its mask requirement by 30 days, meaning all students, staff and visitors will be required to wear masks in its schools until at least Nov. 12.

The board of trustees voted 8-1 to move back the expiration date at an Oct. 11 meeting. The mandate was originally supposed to end on Oct. 15.

The district started enforcing the mandate last month, saying students who refused to wear a mask or did not have a religious or medical exemption would have to learn virtually. The decision sparked several small protests outside of Charleston County schools and the previous board meeting.

Cindy Bohn Coats was the only board member who voted against the mask extension. At the meeting, Coats asked Superintendent Gerrita Postlewait for data on the percentage of students who were wearing masks back when they were optional. Postlewait said the district was did not track mask usage before the mandate was enforced.

“There was this massive conversation in September about protection and I just can’t find this massive number of students who were not doing it,” Coats said during a phone interview with The Post and Courier after the meeting.

Coats has either voted against or abstained from all votes on mask mandates this school year.

The board received legal advice about the mandate in a closed session before the vote. After exiting the closed session, the board directed staff and public health experts “to develop guidelines to inform mask requirements for the remainder of the school year.”

Postlewait also said the number of COVID-19 infections had declined in recent weeks. There were just over 200 cases during the week of Sept. 27, down from a high of 473 cases the week of Aug. 30.

Additionally, the district announced it was offering more testing for students and staff members in an effort to control the spread of the virus. Chief Operating Officer Jeff Borowy said testing is available at seven schools.

On Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, testing is available at Laing Middle School in Mount Pleasant, the Cooper River Center for Advanced Studies in North Charleston and the West Ashley Center for Advanced Studies.

On Tuesdays and Thursdays, people can get tested in the cafeterias at St. Johns High School on Johns Island, the old Lincoln High School building in McClellanville and the old C.C. Blaney Elementary School in Hollywood.

Testing is available at the Burke High School cafeteria on Saturdays.

The testing is funded by a grant from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental control. The DHEC grant covers the testing costs.

Students and staff members can sign up for a test by visiting rrtesting.app/SCSchools. Students and employees will also have to fill out a consent form prior to their testing appointment, which can be found at ccsdschools.com.

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