Trademark Attorney in Hilton Head Island, SC

Ask us Anything

☎ 843-654-0078

Quick Quote

At Sausser Summers, PC, our goal is to make the trademark registration process as straightforward and cost-effective as possible, so that you can focus on growing your business while we take the necessary steps to protect what you have worked so hard to build.

Unlike other law firms, Sausser Summers, PC provides flat fee trademark services at an affordable price. Our goal is to eliminate the uncertainty that comes with hourly work, so you know exactly how much your total expenses will be at the outset of our relationship.

With a BBB A+ rating, we are consistently ranked as one of the top trademark law firms in the U.S. We aim to provide you with the same five-star service that you would receive from large firms, with a modern twist at a rate that won’t break the bank.

Service Areas

How Sausser Summers, PC Flat Fee Trademark Service Works

Our flat fee trademark process is simple, streamlined, and consists of three steps:

Our three-step process lets you:

Trademark Services at a Glance

Whether you need help maintaining your current trademark or require assistance canceling an abandoned mark, Sausser Summers, PC is here to help. Here are just a few of the trademark services that we provide to clients:

Comprehensive Trademark Search

For many entrepreneurs, this is the first and most crucial step to take when it’s time to safeguard your business and intellectual property. Your trademark attorney in Hilton Head Island will conduct a thorough search of the USPTO Federal Trademark Database and each U.S state’s trademark database. We will also perform a trademark domain name search and a trademark common law search on your behalf. We will follow up with a 30-minute phone call, where we will discuss the results of our trademark search and send you a drafted legal opinion letter.

U.S. Trademark Filing

Once your trademark lawyer in Hilton Head Island has completed a comprehensive trademark search, the next step is to file a trademark application. We will submit your application within 1-3 business days and keep you updated on its USPTO status throughout the registration process.

U.S Trademark Office Actions – These actions are essentially initial rejections of your trademark by the USPTO. Applicants have six months in which to respond to this rejection. For a flat fee, your trademark lawyer from Sausser Summers, PC will compose

U.S Trademark Renewal

If you already own a trademark, Sausser Summers, PC will renew your registered trademark so that it remains current. Extended protection varies depending on how long you have held your trademark. We encourage you to visit our U.S Trademark Renewal page to find out which renewal service best fits your current situation.

U.S. Trademark Cease & Desist

Whether you have been accused of infringing on someone’s trademark and received a cease and desist letter or have found an infringer on your own mark, it is imperative that you respond. If you have received a letter and do not respond, you might be sued. If you find an infringer and do not demand that they stop, you may lose your trademark rights. To discuss the best course of action for your situation, we recommend you contact Sausser Summers, PC, for a risk-free consultation at no additional cost. Once you speak directly to one of our attorneys, we will send your cease and desist letter or respond to the one you have received for an affordable flat fee.

Statement of Use

If you plan on using your mark in commerce, you must file a Statement of Use to notify the USPTO. This filing must take place six months after you receive your Notice of Allowance. For an affordable flat-rate fee, your trademark attorney in Hilton Head Island will make any requisite filings on your behalf. Before you decide on a course of action, we encourage you to contact our office at (843) 654-0078 to speak with one of our attorneys. This consultation will help us get a better understanding of your situation and is always free and confidential.

U.S. Trademark Filing of Name and Logo

I Have a Word Mark & Logo!

*USPTO filing fee of $250 for one international class is included, as mentioned above. Additional fees will apply if multiple classes. If you have any questions about the total cost please contact us prior to submitting this form.

Order Now

Latest News in Hilton Head Island, SC

Starfish are beaching along the South Carolina shore in large numbers. Here's why

While it’s sometimes hard to tell, in most cases, these starfish are still alive.HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. — Large quantities of starfish have been seen scattered along Hilton Head Island beaches recently. Although it may look alarming, this is actually a natural event that’s fairly common in the Lowcountry.Users, both locals, and tourists, took to Facebook shocked at their findings along t...

While it’s sometimes hard to tell, in most cases, these starfish are still alive.

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. — Large quantities of starfish have been seen scattered along Hilton Head Island beaches recently. Although it may look alarming, this is actually a natural event that’s fairly common in the Lowcountry.

Users, both locals, and tourists, took to Facebook shocked at their findings along the shores of Hilton Head Island beaches. One user reported finding up to 30 starfish on her morning beach walk and swiftly returned them to the ocean waters.

The numbers of starfish are on a smaller scale than the mass quantities of starfish that have become stranded in previous years. In 2018, over 1,000 starfish washed ashore on Lowcountry beaches, with Hilton Head Island included in those sightings. Roughly 100,000 starfish washed ashore on Fripp Island beaches in 2014.

Typically, in the winter or spring months when the temperatures are cooler in the Lowcountry these starfish, also known as sea stars, are more prone to large-scale strandings from being washed ashore. The reason behind this is that starfish are ectothermic or cold-blooded. This causes them and other small, ectothermic marine animals to lose most of their mobility until they can reach warmer temperatures. Thus, they are at the mercy of the tides. Contrarily, if sea stars reach too warm of temperatures, they will remove their own arms to protect against overheating. They can also do this to evade predators.

Temperatures near Hilton Head have recently seen lows in the upper 50s and low 60s.

Another possible reason they could be stranded is due to a phenomenon called ‘starballing.’ In this case, starfish curl their arms into a ball, allowing them access to faster modes of transportation via strong winds, currents, and tidal conditions. When this occurs, the sea stars can be seen rolling over the seafloor. Some even reach out an arm as if to test the currents.

If starfish are found washed ashore, one shouldn’t automatically assume they are dead.

While it’s sometimes hard to tell, in most cases, these starfish are still alive. Beachgoers who view them from a close distance might even see them slowly crawling along the shore or catch a glimpse of their tubular feet moving.

These tubular feet look almost like moving hairs underneath the arms of a starfish. These ‘feet,’ or small tubular projections, are what make sea stars echinoderms. Other echinoderms with tubular projections on their undersides include sea urchins, sand dollars, and sea cucumbers.

Even if these feet aren’t seen to be distinguishably moving, beachgoers should still throw them back into the water. They may just be moving slower than can be seen with the naked eye, meaning the sea star is alive and should be rescued when possible.

On Hilton Head Island, it’s illegal to disturb or take home any living beach organism, including starfish and sand dollars. Doing so could result in a $500 fine.

Municipal Code Title 8 Chapter 1 — “Beaches” describes the illegality of causing any physical harm, harassment, or disturbance of any marine fauna on Hilton Head Island.

For a complete list of prohibited beach activities, visit this Hilton Head Island website.

Ouch! Don’t touch these caterpillars invading the SC Lowcountry. 3 things to know

Are you being overrun by furry, red-headed caterpillars down in the Lowcountry? These hairy looking insects are called tussock moth caterpillars and they are raiding the Lowcountry.There are several different types of tussock moth caterpillars. The ones we have here in the Lowcountry are white-marked tussock moths. From the subfamily Lymantriinae, these insects can be distinguished as male versus female by first being able to i...

Are you being overrun by furry, red-headed caterpillars down in the Lowcountry? These hairy looking insects are called tussock moth caterpillars and they are raiding the Lowcountry.

There are several different types of tussock moth caterpillars. The ones we have here in the Lowcountry are white-marked tussock moths. From the subfamily Lymantriinae, these insects can be distinguished as male versus female by first being able to identify the males. Males have wings like a typical moth, whereas females are wingless and remain as the caterpillars that storm the Lowcountry in the late spring and summer months.

White-marked tussock moth caterpillars are about an inch or two long. They have four brush-like tufts on their backs, which are sometimes described as looking like a toothbrush. They also have two clusters of long black quills, which extend from either side of the head and give the appearance of antennae.

Before the males turn into moths, these furry guys become small, white cocoons that can be found dotted around the Lowcountry everywhere.

The female moths generally stay near their own empty cocoons. They lay their eggs on this cocoon, covering it with a secretion to protect them. The female moth then dies shortly after.

White-marked tussock moths will produce two different generations each year. The first generation of these caterpillars emerge from their eggs in the spring. Once hatched, they feed on surrounding flora for four to six weeks before pupating into their mature stage. After two weeks, the adult moth then emerges from the cocoon. At this stage, they are ready to mate and lay eggs. The cycle is then repeated, allowing for the second generation of the year, according to ThoughtCo.

In the Lowcountry, these moths can pretty much be found anywhere.

Live near any live oak trees?

This is a favorite snack of white-marked tussock moths. While live oaks are their preferred choice, they feed on a variety of different plants. These may include oak, cherry, birch, apple and some coniferous trees such as fir and spruce.

In large numbers, these caterpillars can cause significant damage to the local flora and can be found anywhere from palmetto fronds to scouring nearby buildings.

If you happen to come across one of these little caterpillars, do not touch it.

The prickly hairs covering the entirety of the caterpillar are for more than just show. They are the caterpillars’ defense mechanism. They are not poisonous or venomous, but it is important to acknowledge that children are more susceptible to receiving a rash than adults, according to The University of Maine.

This rash can be persistent and painful.

There are chemicals that cover the hairs and coat the skin on contact. This can be when they are picked up or touched by a curious child or adult. Once they are touched, it can cause an allergic reaction in humans. This results in a rash consisting of redness, irritation and welts. Their hairs are barbed, which can make them difficult to remove from your skin, according to InsectIdentification.

Whether male or female, there is no shortage of white-marked tussock moth caterpillars in the Lowcountry. Next time you see one, try to avoid touching it. Although small, cute and furry, it might not be worth the rash. Consider appreciating the insect from afar or snapping a picture instead.

Fripp Island: the Hilton Head alternative, beach resort you’ve probably never heard of

FRIPP ISLAND, South Carolina – You can practically see Hilton Head from the tip of Fripp Island.From the map, I’m pretty sure I could swim between them. But it’s an hour and a half by car. And that’s the way Fripp likes it, cut off from the rest of the tourists in South Carolina’s Lowcountry.There are no grocery stores on Fripp, a 6.5-square-mile private resort off the coast of Beaufort, between Charleston, S.C., and Savan...

FRIPP ISLAND, South Carolina – You can practically see Hilton Head from the tip of Fripp Island.

From the map, I’m pretty sure I could swim between them. But it’s an hour and a half by car. And that’s the way Fripp likes it, cut off from the rest of the tourists in South Carolina’s Lowcountry.

There are no grocery stores on Fripp, a 6.5-square-mile private resort off the coast of Beaufort, between Charleston, S.C., and Savannah, Georgia. There are no outlet malls, no hotels, no mini golf and no crowds – at least when we rented a house with friends for spring break.

Fewer than 1,000 people live on the island year-round, though the population swells to about 5,000 during the summer months.

Many of those are families on vacation: plunging in the Atlantic Ocean, jumping in the pool, playing tennis, playing golf, bicycling, fishing, paddleboarding, golf carting or just lounging under the shade of palm trees.

Fripp offers a few restaurants. But if you want to paint the town, you can drive 30 minutes west to Beaufort, recently voted best small town in the South by the readers of Southern Living magazine (which generally serves as my travel and daydreaming guide). There you can wander the mansions of the Spanish-moss-draped historic district, a kaleidoscope of charming boutiques on Bay Street and the sun-dappled patios of restaurants along the Beaufort River.

We spent one day in Beaufort, which I had visited eight years ago on a girls weekend. But the rest of our week passed in a golden haze on Fripp.

Why Fripp?

We chose the island simply because of an incredible house we found on Vrbo with a pool, hot tub, waterslide and fire pit. At 12 hours away, the destination was just within the range of a one-day drive, though if you want to fly you can, to the Savannah and Charleston airports. When people asked where we were going, and I said, Fripp, most looked confused. “What?”

The name is not for the perfect abundance of possible puns, many of which grace mailboxes: Fripp Floppin’, Fripp-a-dee-doo-dah and A Long Strange Fripp.

The island is named after Johannes Fripp, a 17th-century swashbuckling privateer or a British sailor who protected the area from Spanish attacks, depending on who you ask. Legend says that pirates hid treasure on the island. But for much of its history the island was used primarily for hunting, as was the appropriately named Hunting Island to the north. Hunting Island is now a 5,000-acre state park, with trails, a beach and an 1875-built lighthouse currently closed for repair.

A bridge from Hunting Island to Fripp was built in 1961. Over the next decade, the Ocean Point Golf Links, racquet club, marina, houses and condos were built, all part of the Fripp Island Golf & Beach Resort.

The island remains private and unincorporated, with many of the homes rented directly through the resort itself. You must pass a security gate to enter the island, and to use any amenities, including the two golf courses, four pools, kids’ activities or restaurants, you must buy a $35 club card good for a week, for each family member 13 and older.

But once you’re on Fripp, you may never want to leave the paradise of palm trees, far removed from the everyday world.

This is a place where your calendar is completely free, where your biggest question is beach or pool – and the answer is, both. Where you can set up the Risk board and play all week long. Where there’s no point in packing dressy dangly earrings because you’ll only wear swimsuits and T-shirts anyway.

The island is bigger than I expected, with space to spread out and deer everywhere. But it’s compact enough that you can park your car for the week and travel everywhere on bikes or golf carts.

We mostly stayed put. We stocked up on groceries in Beaufort and cooked dinner every night, sharing kitchen duties so it made clean-up easy. We shared kid-wrangling duties, too, so while the kids hung out with their friends, the parents felt like they actually got a vacation.

We whiled away our days spotting dolphins and an alligator, riding golf carts, picking up shells, swimming and playing football on the sand. We lazed away our evenings cooking dinner, sitting in the hot tub, playing cards and telling stories around the fire.

That’s not to say we had no plans. We shopped and lunched in Beaufort one morning and rented boats. I took a tennis lesson and was absolutely glowing by the end of the hour with compliments and helpful tips. We hit balls on the driving range. We paddleboarded. We boogie-boarded. We visited the Hunting Island lighthouse. And my 9-year-old daughter and I took a surfing lesson through Nalu Paddleboarding, a shop located at the Fripp Marina.

She was a natural who popped up on her first try, even turned around to wave. I was definitely not, but thanks to the patience of our instructor, I did manage to stand up a few times on the board. More importantly, I felt invigorated trying something completely new.

Completely new, completely chill. Frippee-ki-yay!

If you go:

Check Vrbo or Fripp Island Resort to search for houses and condos.

Prices depend on amenities and location, though you can get anywhere on the island easily by bike or golf cart.

During summer months, expect to pay $300 or more a night for a two-bedroom condo.

Houses vary from sleeping four to 16. A 14-person, house, for example, could cost about $600 a night.

Note to readers: if you purchase something through one of our affiliate links we may earn a commission.

There have been many beached starfish on SC shores lately. Here’s why

Large quantities of starfish have been seen scattered along Hilton Head Island beaches this week. Although it may look alarming, this is actually a natural event that’s fairly common here in the Lowcountry.Users, both locals and tourists, took to Facebook this week shocked at their findings along the shores of Hilton Head Island beaches. One user reported finding up to 30 starfish on her morning beach walk and swiftly returned them to the ocean waters.The numbers of starfish seen this week are on the smaller-scale of the ...

Large quantities of starfish have been seen scattered along Hilton Head Island beaches this week. Although it may look alarming, this is actually a natural event that’s fairly common here in the Lowcountry.

Users, both locals and tourists, took to Facebook this week shocked at their findings along the shores of Hilton Head Island beaches. One user reported finding up to 30 starfish on her morning beach walk and swiftly returned them to the ocean waters.

The numbers of starfish seen this week are on the smaller-scale of the mass quantities of starfish that have become stranded in previous years. In 2018, over 1,000 starfish washed ashore on Lowcountry beaches, with Hilton Head Island included in those sightings. Roughly 100,000 starfish washed ashore on Fripp Island beaches in 2014.

Typically, in the winter or spring months when the temperatures are cooler in the Lowcountry these starfish, also known as sea stars, are more prone to large-scale strandings from being washed ashore. The reason behind this is that starfish are ectothermic or cold-blooded. This causes them and other small, ectothermic marine animals to lose most of their mobility until they can reach warmer temperatures. Thus, they are at the mercy of the tides. Contrarily, if sea stars reach too warm of temperatures, they will remove their own arms to protect against overheating. They can also do this to evade predators.

Temperatures this week near Hilton Head have seen lows in the upper 50’s and low 60’s.

Another possible reason they could be stranded is due to a phenomenon called ‘starballing.’ In this case, starfish curl their arms into a ball, allowing them access to faster modes of transportation via strong winds, currents and tidal conditions. When this occurs, the sea stars can be seen rolling over the seafloor. Some even reach out an arm as if to test the currents.

If starfish are found washed ashore, one shouldn’t automatically assume they are dead.

While it’s sometimes hard to tell, in most cases, these starfish are still alive. Beachgoers who view them from a close distance might even see them slowly crawling along the shore or catch a glimpse of their tubular feet moving.

These tubular feet look almost like moving hairs underneath the arms of a starfish. These ‘feet,’ or small tubular projections, are what make sea stars echinoderms. Other echinoderms with tubular projections on their undersides include sea urchins, sand dollars and sea cucumbers.

Even if these feet aren’t seen to be distinguishably moving, beachgoers should still throw them back into the water. They may just be moving slower than can be seen with the naked eye, meaning the sea star is alive and should be rescued when possible.

On Hilton Head Island, it’s illegal to disturb or take home any living beach organism, including starfish and sand dollars. Doing so could result in a $500 fine.

Municipal Code Title 8 Chapter 1 - “Beaches” describes the illegality of causing any physical harm, harassment, or disturbance of any marine fauna on Hilton Head Island.

For a complete list of prohibited beach activities, visit https://www.hiltonheadislandsc.gov/beach/regulations.cfm.

Silent no more: Community event on Hilton Head to raise money for people of Ukraine

One story in the Torah that has always haunted me is the episode in Leviticus chapter 10:1-3 where the two sons of Aaron, Nadav and Abihu, were caught offering a sacrifice contrary to the instructions of God. Suddenly God sends a fire that consumes them and they perish. Then the Torah says: “Then Moses said to Aaron, “This is what Adonai (The Lord) meant when God said: Through those near to Me I show Myself holy and gain glory before all the people.”And Aaron was silent.It is the last phrase that I cannot gras...

One story in the Torah that has always haunted me is the episode in Leviticus chapter 10:1-3 where the two sons of Aaron, Nadav and Abihu, were caught offering a sacrifice contrary to the instructions of God. Suddenly God sends a fire that consumes them and they perish. Then the Torah says: “Then Moses said to Aaron, “This is what Adonai (The Lord) meant when God said: Through those near to Me I show Myself holy and gain glory before all the people.”

And Aaron was silent.

It is the last phrase that I cannot grasp in my soul. One medieval commentator wrote, “Aaron was silent because Aaron’s heart turned to lifeless stone. He did not weep and mourn like a bereaved father, nor did he accept Moses’ attempts to console him, for his soul had left him and he was speechless.”

Aaron’s silence is what haunts me. He is beyond tears and anger and all the rest of the spectrum of human emotions at that moment.

We are used to silence as a means of reflection and meditation. Silence is a healing experience. Silence is a retreat into ourselves to behold a deeper truth about ourselves and God. For me, silence is the beginning of the poetic moment. Silence is a pathway to God.

Aaron’s silence is one formed from rage and shock.Yet, there is a another kind of silence that is destructive. There is a silence when we see gross injustice and destruction and we remain silent that sends a completely different message. That kind of silence means acquiescence and approval to something evil and unjust. Silence as a form of assent to a war, for example, like what we are seeing Russia and Putin conduct in Ukraine. That kind of silence is a profane and godless action itself.

For this reason, I have story to tell you that defies that kind of immoral and sacrilegious silence. This story is about those in Hilton Head who say, “We will not be silent to the unprovoked and despicable conduct which we witness every day in the media in Russia’s war against the people of Ukraine.” These citizens of Hilton Head say “Enough!”

A consortium of communal leaders from the business community, nonprofits and the interfaith communities have joined together and in a few short weeks have put together a plan to raise funds with the guidance and support of the Community Foundation of the Lowcountry and the town of Hilton Head to present an event that says, ‘We will not be silent to the bloodshed.’

At noon on May 22 at Celebration Park, the community is invited to a concert ranging from classical music from the Symphony Orchestra to Hilton Head’s favorite rock ‘n’ roll bands. The concert will be free and the hope is that we shall succeed in raising funds through individual donations and sponsorships from the business community for two charities. For medical supplies the proceeds will go to Doctors Without Boarders. For food supplies to refugees and those still inside Ukraine, the proceeds will go to World Central Kitchen founded by chef Jose Andres.

When we think about what makes Hilton Head special we tend to answer, ‘Nice people and great beaches and golf.’ All that is true but do we forget that what makes us a faith in action community is that we can put aside all that divides us and unify under the banner of “L’chayim To Life: To save a soul is to save the world.”

That is exactly what this event will do, which is to save the lives of Ukrainian people. This concert and the fundraising and sponsorships that I hope individuals and businesses will support is our community’s way of making a difference. So many people have said to me, ‘How can I help? I feel helpless. What can I do?’

Our refusal to remain silent in the face of indiscriminate and cruel bombing, executions and kidnapping populations of non-combatants back to Russia requires us to say, ‘No more.’ It should ring a bell throughout the land that we learned a lesson from World War II when the world was silent as the Nazis and their collaborators committed genocide against the Jewish people and many others in Europe.

Yes, the world was silent. Now we have a chance to learn and prove to ourselves let alone to God that we are different. Hilton Head is different and it is something I am appealing to everyone to give what we can to this worthy event. Go to HH4Ukraine.com and you will find a link taking you directly into the Community Foundation website where you can make your donation. It is so easy to do. Just click and save a life.

I am directly involved in this group and I wish you could see how these leaders who did not know each other before this effort have risen to the high ground and done what appeared to be the impossible in a few short weeks. These are some of Hilton Head’s finest citizens. You, too, can join them in this noble effort.

If we can all join together and take great pride in the PGA Heritage golf tournament as a flagship event in our community, can we add one more event to show the world who we are and how we care, and that we are willing to share our resources with those most in need at this hour? Is this not doing God’s work?

Join us on May 22 and enjoy the music, the community and the feeling of saying, “I made a difference and I helped save lives.”

Rabbi Brad L. Bloom serves Congregation Beth Yam. He attended the University of Wisconsin and lives on Hilton Head Island.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.