Trademark Attorney in Hilton Head Island, SC

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At Sausser Summers, PC, our goal is to make the trademark registration process as straightforward and cost-effective as possible, so that you can focus on growing your business while we take the necessary steps to protect what you have worked so hard to build.

Unlike other law firms, Sausser Summers, PC provides flat fee trademark services at an affordable price. Our goal is to eliminate the uncertainty that comes with hourly work, so you know exactly how much your total expenses will be at the outset of our relationship.

With a BBB A+ rating, we are consistently ranked as one of the top trademark law firms in the U.S. We aim to provide you with the same five-star service that you would receive from large firms, with a modern twist at a rate that won’t break the bank.

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How Sausser Summers, PC Flat Fee Trademark Service Works

Our flat fee trademark process is simple, streamlined, and consists of three steps:

Our three-step process lets you:

Trademark Services at a Glance

Whether you need help maintaining your current trademark or require assistance canceling an abandoned mark, Sausser Summers, PC is here to help. Here are just a few of the trademark services that we provide to clients:

Comprehensive Trademark Search

For many entrepreneurs, this is the first and most crucial step to take when it’s time to safeguard your business and intellectual property. Your trademark attorney in Hilton Head Island will conduct a thorough search of the USPTO Federal Trademark Database and each U.S state’s trademark database. We will also perform a trademark domain name search and a trademark common law search on your behalf. We will follow up with a 30-minute phone call, where we will discuss the results of our trademark search and send you a drafted legal opinion letter.

U.S. Trademark Filing

Once your trademark lawyer in Hilton Head Island has completed a comprehensive trademark search, the next step is to file a trademark application. We will submit your application within 1-3 business days and keep you updated on its USPTO status throughout the registration process.

U.S Trademark Office Actions – These actions are essentially initial rejections of your trademark by the USPTO. Applicants have six months in which to respond to this rejection. For a flat fee, your trademark lawyer from Sausser Summers, PC will compose

U.S Trademark Renewal

If you already own a trademark, Sausser Summers, PC will renew your registered trademark so that it remains current. Extended protection varies depending on how long you have held your trademark. We encourage you to visit our U.S Trademark Renewal page to find out which renewal service best fits your current situation.

U.S. Trademark Cease & Desist

Whether you have been accused of infringing on someone’s trademark and received a cease and desist letter or have found an infringer on your own mark, it is imperative that you respond. If you have received a letter and do not respond, you might be sued. If you find an infringer and do not demand that they stop, you may lose your trademark rights. To discuss the best course of action for your situation, we recommend you contact Sausser Summers, PC, for a risk-free consultation at no additional cost. Once you speak directly to one of our attorneys, we will send your cease and desist letter or respond to the one you have received for an affordable flat fee.

Statement of Use

If you plan on using your mark in commerce, you must file a Statement of Use to notify the USPTO. This filing must take place six months after you receive your Notice of Allowance. For an affordable flat-rate fee, your trademark attorney in Hilton Head Island will make any requisite filings on your behalf. Before you decide on a course of action, we encourage you to contact our office at (843) 654-0078 to speak with one of our attorneys. This consultation will help us get a better understanding of your situation and is always free and confidential.

U.S. Trademark Filing of Name and Logo

I Have a Word Mark & Logo!

*USPTO filing fee of $250 for one international class is included, as mentioned above. Additional fees will apply if multiple classes. If you have any questions about the total cost please contact us prior to submitting this form.

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Latest News in Hilton Head Island, SC

Beaufort County senior is among 2 from SC selected to attend U.S. youth government program

There are thousands of high school students in South Carolina public schools, but each year only two are selected for the U.S. Youth Senate Program. This year, Beaufort County’s Madison Hahn, a senior at May River High School, is one of them.“I am so proud of you and for you and your family,” State Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman said on a Zoom call with Hahn. “We’re so thankful and proud to have you represent the state of South Carolina.”Greenville County’s Kshiraj Talati al...

There are thousands of high school students in South Carolina public schools, but each year only two are selected for the U.S. Youth Senate Program. This year, Beaufort County’s Madison Hahn, a senior at May River High School, is one of them.

“I am so proud of you and for you and your family,” State Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman said on a Zoom call with Hahn. “We’re so thankful and proud to have you represent the state of South Carolina.”

Greenville County’s Kshiraj Talati also won. Hahn and Talati, along with two representatives from each of the other 49 states, will receive a $10,000 college scholarship from The Hearst Foundation, which funds the program.

In March, they will attend briefings and meetings with Biden, U.S. senators, a Supreme Court justice, cabinet members, federal agency leaders and members of the national media, according to the program website.

After being nominated as an alternate last year, Hahn said she is excited to go to Washington for the first time.

“The experience is so unique to anything else. It’s crazy that you can really put face to a name, shake a hand,” she said. “I’m so excited to see these people and be able to see the Capitol.”

Hahn qualified by holding a leadership position — class president — and was then nominated by teachers.

“I was nominated this year because of my success last year,” Hahn said, explaining that last year she went to every social studies teacher she knew and told them how much she wanted to be in the program.

Once nominated, candidates took a test on the constitution, government, civics, politics and current events. The state’s top 10 scores were interviewed by a panel including Department of Education employees, University of South Carolina political science faculty and members of U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham’s campaign team.

“At that point, it’s all about your performance in the interview,” Hahn said. “I’ve done a lot of stuff through my Youth in Government program and I do mock trial and mock appeals. That’s really helped me learn how to answer questions well, think on my feet well, and try to be a little bit more articulate in high-pressure situations.”

Hahn said she wants to study political science and international business for her undergraduate degree and then go to law school to be a corporate or intelligence property lawyer.

“You’re going to be so successful wherever you go,” Spearman said on the Zoom.

This is South Carolina’s most popular New Year’s resolution. Tips if it’s yours too

For many, the New Year is the time to turn a new page and start a new chapter in life.South Carolinians are taking that literally.The state’s most popular New Year’s resolution is to read more, according to a new study from Zippia, a job search website.“As the world continues to bounce back from a pandemic and has spent so many years and months in front of screens, perhaps wanting to tap back into go...

For many, the New Year is the time to turn a new page and start a new chapter in life.

South Carolinians are taking that literally.

The state’s most popular New Year’s resolution is to read more, according to a new study from Zippia, a job search website.

“As the world continues to bounce back from a pandemic and has spent so many years and months in front of screens, perhaps wanting to tap back into good old-fashioned reading is at the forefront of a lot of people’s minds,” Beaufort County Library Director Amanda Dickman said.

The study analyzed Google Trends data to find the most common resolution-related searches in January.

Five states shared South Carolina’s resolution, but the most popular resolution was to seek therapy, which was 12 states’ top resolution, according to the Zippia study.

Eight states had the second most popular resolution, to lose weight, according to the study.

A different, nationwide Statista survey didn’t have the Zippia study’s top resolution on their list. Instead, the data collection website ranked the following resolutions as their top five by surveying over 400 adults across the U.S.:

1. Exercise more

2. Eat healthier

3. Lose weight

4. Save more money

5. Spend more time with family and friends

For those who share the state’s most popular resolution, here are some tips:

Join a book club

In addition to book recommendations, book clubs provide a community to share and discuss your ideas. Plus, having to adhere to a reading schedule might be a needed incentive.

With names like “Tea Talk and Tales” and “The Novel Choice Book Club” the Beaufort County Library system has in-person groups that span most genres.

Keep an eye out on The Pat Conroy Center for book club conventions and events.

For those who prefer partaking in book clubs from the comfort of their own reading nook, digital book clubs could be the answer. Book clubs like “Reese’s Book Club,” “Oprah’s Book Club,” “Between Two Books” or “Read with Jenna” could be a place to start.

Always have a book ready

Whether you’re relaxing on Burkes Beach or taking a needed break from work, make it easy to fill the time with literature by having a book on hand. Make an effort to pack your latest read in your beach bag or work bag.

Embrace reading without an actual book

For some people, nothing beats the smell of a book, the creamy pages in hand, earmarking a page to come back to.

For others, technology is more convenient than a physical book, and Apple, Spotify, Amazon and Beaufort County libraries have options for that too.

“Whether you like to read on a tablet or on your phone or whether you like it to be read to you in the form of an audio book or digital audio,” Dickman said, “libraries have that.”

Use apps to track your reading

If readers want something to keep them accountable, reading apps could be their solution.

Apps like Goodreads, The StoryGraph and Booksloth allow readers to track which books they and their friends want to read, are reading and have completed.

Zippia’s complete list of resolutions by state is:

Alabama — Weight loss

Alaska — Better Sleep

Arizona — Therapy

Arkansas — Read More

California — Dating

Colorado — Meet New People

Connecticut — Therapy

Delaware — Weight loss

District of Columbia — Dating

Florida — Therapy

Georgia — Read More

Hawaii — Dating

Idaho — Weight training

Illinois — Dating

Indiana — Weight loss

Iowa — Save Money

Kansas — Better Sleep

Kentucky — Weight loss

Louisiana — Therapy

Maine — Therapy

Maryland — Therapy

Massachusetts — Vacation

Michigan — Dating

Minnesota — Therapy

Mississippi — Save Money

Missouri — Therapy

Montana — Weight training

Nebraska — Weight training

Nevada — Dating

New Hampshire — Vacation

New Jersey — Therapy

New Mexico — Get A Raise

New York — Therapy

North Carolina — Read More

North Dakota — Save Money

Ohio — Weight loss

Oklahoma — Meet New People

Oregon—Better Sleep

Pennsylvania — Therapy

Rhode Island — Weight loss

South Carolina — Read More

South Dakota — Quit Drinking

Tennessee — Therapy

Texas — New Job

Utah — Dating

Vermont — Weight loss

Virginia — Read More

Washington — Better Sleep

West Virginia — Weight loss

Wisconsin — Vacation

High School Scoreboard - December 29, 2022

HAZARD, Ky. (WYMT) - High School basketball tournaments continue to chug along as 2022 draws to a close.BOYS’ BASKETBALLBlue Ridge (St. George) , VA 57, Perry County Central 54, Ashland Invitational TournamentCollins 62, Lincoln County 47, Ashland Invitational TournamentNewport Central Catholic 98, Williamsburg 82, Bill Perkins Holiday ClassicBishop England (Charleston) SC 56, Lawrence County 36, Carolina InvitationalJohnson Central 47, Greenup County 42, Carolina InvitationalJenkins 62,...

HAZARD, Ky. (WYMT) - High School basketball tournaments continue to chug along as 2022 draws to a close.

BOYS’ BASKETBALL

Blue Ridge (St. George) , VA 57, Perry County Central 54, Ashland Invitational Tournament

Collins 62, Lincoln County 47, Ashland Invitational Tournament

Newport Central Catholic 98, Williamsburg 82, Bill Perkins Holiday Classic

Bishop England (Charleston) SC 56, Lawrence County 36, Carolina Invitational

Johnson Central 47, Greenup County 42, Carolina Invitational

Jenkins 62, Hurley, VA 45, Cavalier Christmas Classic

Jackson County 74, Claiborne (New Tazewell), TN 65, Chain Rock Classic

Pineville, 66, Gallatin County, 61, Chain Rock Classic

Prestonsburg, 70, Middlesboro, 55, Chain Rock Classic

Frederick Douglass, 62, Harlan, 53, Dan Swartz Classic

Pulaski County, 77, Perry, OH, 56, Daytona Beach Sunshine Classic

South Laurel, 52, Peachtree Ridge (Suwanee), GA, 43, Daytona Beach Sunshine Classic

Mercer County, 83, Knox Central, 28, Ellis Trucking Christmas Classic

Corbin, 65, Newport, 52, Grace Health Cumberland Falls Invitational

Avon, IN, 63, Betsy Layne, 48, Mountain Schoolboy Classic

Huntington, WV, 72, Floyd Central, 71, Mountain Schoolboy Classic

Magoffin County, 58, South Gibson (Medina), TN, 45, Mountain Schoolboy Classic

Pike County Central, 67, Breathitt County, 65, Mountain Schoolboy Classic

South Gibson (Medina), TN, 60, Belfry, 39, Mountain Schoolboy Classic

Shelby Valley, 60, Eastside [Coeburn/St. Paul] (Coeburn), VA, 38, Powell Valley National Bank Holiday Classic

Paintsville, 73, Estill County, 70, Railroad Classic

Trimble County, 55, Leslie County, 51, Ray Zellar Christmas Classic

Great Crossing, 74, Pikeville, 57, Smoky Mountain Christmas Classic

Harlan County, 60, Sardis (Boaz), AL, 26, Smoky Mountain Winter Classic

Evangel Christian, 67, Southwestern, 33, Trojan Hoops Holiday Classic

Clay County, 68, Logan County, 61

Somerset,75, Somerset Christian School, 61

GIRLS’ BASKETBALL

North Laurel, 84, Chattooga (Summerville), GA, 39, ASA Christmas Clash

Bishop Brossart, 59, Perry County Central, 51, Berea Holiday Classic

Clay County, 49, Paul Laurence Dunbar, 38, Berea Holiday Classic

Floyd Central, 65, Harlan, 54, Berea Holiday Classic

Jackson County, 56, Berea, 36, Berea Holiday Classic

Madison Central, 65, Corbin, 56, Berea Holiday Classic

Lynn Camp, 50, Grace Christian Academy (Franklin), TN, 42, Bill Perkins Holiday Classic

Williamsburg, 69, Jellico, TN, 44, Bill Perkins Holiday Classic

Johnson Central, 43, Stall (Charleston), SC, 26, Carolina Invitational

Lawrence County, 62, Hilton Head Christian Academy (Hilton Head Island), SC, 34, Carolina Invitational

Harlan County, 51, Pineville, 46, Chain Rock Classic

John Hardin, 55, Middlesboro, 28, Chain Rock Classic

Estill County, 54, Fleming County, 40 City Between the Lakes Christmas Classic

Paintsville, 45, Ridgeview (Clintwood), VA, 43, City Between the Lakes Christmas Classic

Martin County 60, Hopkins County Central, 56, Daytona Beach Sunshine Classic

Montgomery County, 60, Pulaski County, 45, Daytona Beach Sunshine Classic

Dickson County (Dickson), TN, 69, Leslie County, 55, Hilton Sandestin Beach Blowout

Elliott County, 56, Shelby Valley, 44, Ryan Keeton ExP Realty Ohio River Classic

Huntington St. Joseph Prep (Huntington), WV, 53, East Carter, 49, Ryan Keeton ExP Realty Ohio River Classic

Raceland, 66, Magoffin County, 49 , Ryan Keeton ExP Realty Ohio River Classic

Bell County, 68, Sardis (Boaz), AL, 35, Smoky Mountain Christmas Classic

Owsley County, 69, Burton (Norton), VA, 46, Smoky Mountain Christmas Classic

Southwestern, 51, Soddy Daisy, TN, 33, Smoky Mountain Christmas Classic

Knott County Central, 56, Powell County, 46

Copyright 2022 WYMT. All rights reserved.

What’s the deal with the famous ‘little blue boat’ of Hilton Head? Here’s everything to know

This year, many users have taken to Facebook to comment on the mysterious blue and white sailboat moored beside the bridge to Hilton Head Island from the mainland.Dubbed the “little blue boat,” many Facebook users have established it as a new Hilton Head landmark and have labeled it as “iconic.”Originally located offshore by the Daufuskie Island Ferry dock in Bluffton, the little boat made its way to the other side of the 278 bridge to Hilton Head Island into a salt marsh following the winds from this ye...

This year, many users have taken to Facebook to comment on the mysterious blue and white sailboat moored beside the bridge to Hilton Head Island from the mainland.

Dubbed the “little blue boat,” many Facebook users have established it as a new Hilton Head landmark and have labeled it as “iconic.”

Originally located offshore by the Daufuskie Island Ferry dock in Bluffton, the little boat made its way to the other side of the 278 bridge to Hilton Head Island into a salt marsh following the winds from this year’s storms.

The boat has garnered so much attention that Facebook users have even created the Facebook group “We heart The Little Blue Boat” dedicated to the little sailboat and use this as a platform to help “save” the small vessel.

“Little Blue,” or “Bluey” as it is also called, has also created such a mass following that individuals have created various paintings, art, T-shirts, ornaments, “memes” and small sculptures of the blue-and-white sailboat.

A painting of the sailboat has even been auctioned off to the public.

Some fans of the little sailboat have even proposed the idea of creating a fundraiser to keep the boat in place or creating a replica to “honor it” once it has been removed.

Social media users frequently photograph the boat and take special note of it as they go about their daily activities.

Many locals to the area have commented on social media that seeing the boat “brightens their day” on the way to work or while doing daily errands and would be “so sad” to see it go. In addition, tourists visiting the area have commented on how they “look forward to seeing it” each time they have come to the area this year.

Some of the hundreds of comments of Facebook showing affection for the now poplar boat include:

The owner, Jon Everetts, a charter boat captain for Black Dog Fishing Charters on Hilton Head who has been doing fishing charters for 30 years, is a longtime local who has spent a majority of his life in Beaufort County but has only owned the little blue-and-white sailboat for two years.

It was originally moored by the bridge to avoid paying dockage fees. Aware of the rules, Everetts claimed it was legal to moor his boat in the given area.

The boat has had a tumultuous time while it took up residence beside the bridge. Despite the many days it swayed with the waves on calmer days, it was cut loose following one of the first storms last year and had to be retrieved. Afterward, it was docked farther away from the bridge so “people wouldn’t keep buggin’ DNR about it,” Everetts said.

After one of the most recent storms, it was again cut loose and made its way to the other side of the bridge where it is now stuck in the marsh.

“That thing won’t sink, that’s for sure,” Everetts said about his now famous sailboat.

After recently trying to remove the boat following a removal notice from SCDNR, Everetts is in need of a “giant tide” to move the boat from its current position.

His next attempt at the boat’s removal will be on Christmas Eve.

Everetts, 59, already had plans to remove the boat, but the DNR order quickened the process.

“Originally the boat was not moored illegally. SCDNR is currently in communication with the owner, who has plans to secure the vessel. SCDNR has not set an official timeline at this point but has the authority to do so if the owner does not act to secure the vessel according to state and federal laws and regulations for anchored vessels,” SCDNR responded in a statement.

Unsure what to do with the boat after its removal from the marsh, his wife wants to keep it out, but Everetts said there is work that needs to be done and the boat needs to be fixed first and foremost.

Making the removal process tricky for the boat’s owner, a special sailboat trailer is needed to remove the ‘little blue boat,’ but Everetts does not own one and cannot find one to use.

If he cannot find a trailer, he plans to moor the boat somewhere, but this location will not be near the bridge to Hilton Head from the mainland.

Although the ‘little blue sailboat’ goes by many names on social media, Everetts never officially named the boat himself.

Not a frequent user of Facebook, Everetts is surprised by all the attention his boat has received on the platform.

Users of the social media site have “so much love” for the boat that, unbeknownst to the sailboat’s owner, someone even decorated it for Christmas by hanging a stand of colorful Christmas lights along its side.

When informed that his boat was now decorated, Everetts chuckled and responded, “Well I’ll be darn. They’re trying to help themselves to my boat.”

“I wonder what the lights are being charged with. I’ll have to go check it out,” he continued.

“I’m just shocked. I don’t know, I guess it’s a good thing a lot of people like it huh. But, there’s a few people who don’t, I heard,” Everetts said about the mass following and popularity his boat has amassed.

A majority of the attention toward the sailboat is nothing but positive. However, some worry the boat might eventually affect local water and wildlife health. Plus, some dislike the appearance of an “abandoned” boat in the local waters.

“I don’t know what else to do. I mean, it is what it is. A lot of people have asked ‘well, what’s the deal with it?’ and the deal is it broke loose in the storm. It got washed up. I don’t know what else to tell ya,” Everetts chuckled.

This story was originally published December 13, 2022 8:00 AM.

Dominion prepares to trim trees again in Beaufort. This time you’ll have a say in it

The city of Beaufort is stepping up oversight of tree trimming by Dominion Energy after previous complaints the power company was heavy-handed in its pruning and lack of communication.Dominion will be trimming trees in mid-January through March 1 from Hermitage Road in the north to Camelia Road to the south, and from the Spanish Moss Trail in the west and Ribaut Road to the east, said Neal Pugliese, the city’s project manager.This time, Pugliese said, the city will have its own master arborist oversee the work. The arbori...

The city of Beaufort is stepping up oversight of tree trimming by Dominion Energy after previous complaints the power company was heavy-handed in its pruning and lack of communication.

Dominion will be trimming trees in mid-January through March 1 from Hermitage Road in the north to Camelia Road to the south, and from the Spanish Moss Trail in the west and Ribaut Road to the east, said Neal Pugliese, the city’s project manager.

This time, Pugliese said, the city will have its own master arborist oversee the work. The arborist will be available, along with Pugliese, if residents have questions or concerns, Pugliese said. The city also is working with Dominion to improve communications with residents, Pugliese said.

The city and Dominion are planning a meeting Jan. 10 at City Hall “in order to make sure they understand what the guardrails are,” Pugliese said. A time has not been set.

“Dominion’s has been very cooperative in working with us up to this point,” Pugliese said.

Maintaining areas around power lines is important to ensure safe and reliable service, Dominion spokesman Paul Fischer said, because trees and other forms of vegetation that contact overhead power lines can cause outages and flickers.

“While we understand and appreciate the passion surrounding trees across the Lowcountry, safety remains our top priority,” Fischer said. “Trees that have grown too close to overhead lines are both a fire hazard and an issue of employee and public safety. “

Customers with immediate concerns regarding trees on or near their property can contact Dominion at 800-251-7234. Pugliese, the project manager for the city, can be reached at 714-357-0811.

In June 2021, residents complained that trimming of live oaks and pines was a “butcher job.” Some residents said they also were caught off-guard when large utility poles were installed in their neighborhood, replacing older, smaller poles.

They were most upset, though, about what they said was a lack of communication about the work, saying they felt “blown off.” Residents took their complaints to the City Council, which recommended that Dominion and the city get together to improve communications with the public before future work occurs.

Pugliese updated City Council members on Dec. 13 about Dominion’s upcoming work and the steps to ensure the process runs smoothly.

Trees are pruned about every five years, Pugliese said, to ensure electricity remains reliable and that trees do not interfere with utility lines.

“Hopefully they will be a little more sensitive to our area,” Councilman Neil Lipsitz said.

Protecting trees and ensuring reliable electricity, especially during storms, is a balance, said Mayor Stephen Murray, calling himself a “tree hugger” who also loves electricity.

“I appreciate Dominion Energy’s communication with us this time and giving us a little bit of heads up and time to prepare everybody,” Murray said, “unlike some previous trimming.”

Trees and tree limbs represent the No. 1 reason for power outages, Fischer said. Trees that exceed a maximum height of about 15 feet are not suitable for planting along distribution rights of way or near overhead lines.

Dominion follows national pruning standards outlined by the International Society of Arboriculture, and the company’s aborists also oversee its projects, Fischer said.

This story was originally published December 29, 2022 10:21 AM.

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