Trademark Attorney in Hilton Head Island SC

If you are a successful business owner, protecting your intellectual property rights is one of the most important steps that you can take to safeguard your company. Often, hiring a trademark attorney in Hilton Head Island to register a trademark is an arduous process that results in outrageous hourly fees and complicated paperwork.

At Sausser Summers, PC, our goal is to make the trademark registration process as straightforward and cost-effective as possible, so that you can focus on growing your business while we take the necessary steps to protect what you have worked so hard to build.

Unlike other law firms, Sausser Summers, PC provides flat fee trademark services at an affordable price. Our goal is to eliminate the uncertainty that comes with hourly work, so you know exactly how much your total expenses will be at the outset of our relationship.

With a BBB A+ rating, we are consistently ranked as one of the top trademark law firms in the U.S. We aim to provide you with the same five-star service that you would receive from large firms, with a modern twist at a rate that won’t break the bank.

How Sausser Summers, PC Flat Fee Trademark Service Works

Our flat fee trademark process is simple, streamlined, and consists of three steps:

  1. Choose your trademark service and provide us with information about your trademark through our online questionnaire. Once this is complete, you will pay the flat fee for us to move forward.
  2. Our trademark lawyers in Hilton Head Island will conduct an extensive search to make sure you are in the clear to register your trademark. Once our search has concluded, we will send you a legal opinion letter informing you of our search results.
  3. Our trademark attorneys will file your trademark and provide updates throughout the registration process.

Our three-step process lets you:

  1. Work one-on-one with an experienced trademark attorney in Hilton Head Island who will consult with you at your convenience.
  2. Save your hard-earned money with our flat fee trademark services.
  3. Gain access to a licensed trademark attorney who will file your trademark application.
  4. Get updates on your trademark application as it moves through the registration process.
  5. Focus on running your business while Sausser Summers, PC handles the hard work. No headaches, no hidden fees, no tricks.

Trademark Services at a Glance

Whether you need help maintaining your current trademark or require assistance canceling an abandoned mark, Sausser Summers, PC is here to help. Here are just a few of the trademark services that we provide to clients:

Comprehensive Trademark Search – For many entrepreneurs, this is the first and most crucial step to take when it’s time to safeguard your business and intellectual property. Your trademark attorney in Hilton Head Island will conduct a thorough search of the USPTO Federal Trademark Database and each U.S state’s trademark database. We will also perform a trademark domain name search and a trademark common law search on your behalf. We will follow up with a 30-minute phone call, where we will discuss the results of our trademark search and send you a drafted legal opinion letter.

U.S. Trademark Filing – Once your trademark lawyer in Hilton Head Island has completed a comprehensive trademark search, the next step is to file a trademark application. We will submit your application within 1-3 business days and keep you updated on its USPTO status throughout the registration process.
U.S Trademark Office Actions – These actions are essentially initial rejections of your trademark by the USPTO. Applicants have six months in which to respond to this rejection. For a flat fee, your trademark lawyer from Sausser Summers, PC will compose a response on your behalf so that you may continue to focus on your day-to-day business tasks.

U.S Trademark Renewal – If you already own a trademark, Sausser Summers, PC will renew your registered trademark so that it remains current. Extended protection varies depending on how long you have held your trademark. We encourage you to visit our U.S Trademark Renewal page to find out which renewal service best fits your current situation.

U.S. Trademark Cease & Desist – Whether you have been accused of infringing on someone’s trademark and received a cease and desist letter or have found an infringer on your own mark, it is imperative that you respond. If you have received a letter and do not respond, you might be sued. If you find an infringer and do not demand that they stop, you may lose your trademark rights. To discuss the best course of action for your situation, we recommend you contact Sausser Summers, PC, for a risk-free consultation at no additional cost. Once you speak directly to one of our attorneys, we will send your cease and desist letter or respond to the one you have received for an affordable flat fee.

Statement of Use – If you plan on using your mark in commerce, you must file a Statement of Use to notify the USPTO. This filing must take place six months after you receive your Notice of Allowance. For an affordable flat-rate fee, your trademark attorney in Hilton Head Island will make any requisite filings on your behalf. Before you decide on a course of action, we encourage you to contact our office at (843) 654-0078 to speak with one of our attorneys. This consultation will help us get a better understanding of your situation and is always free and confidential.

Additional U.S Trademark Attorney Services

In addition to the services listed above, we also help our clients enforce their trademarks, monitor trademark filings, and even help protect business owners from trademark infringement on platforms like Amazon and Etsy.
Have questions about our flat-fee trademark services? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your earliest convenience, so that you can preserve the one asset that sets you apart from everyone else: your name.

Latest News in Hilton Head Island

No left turns? A new boat ramp? How Pinckney Island could change during US 278 project

Say goodbye to those harrowing left turns onto Pinckney Island. The S.C. Department of Transportation wants to overhaul the island’s entrance as part of its $290 million plan to demolish the existing Hilton Head Island bridges and replace them with a single, six-lane bridge. The state has proposed a slew of changes on Pinckney Island, where 200,000 visitors explore the area’s salt marsh and tidal creeks every year....

Say goodbye to those harrowing left turns onto Pinckney Island.

The S.C. Department of Transportation wants to overhaul the island’s entrance as part of its $290 million plan to demolish the existing Hilton Head Island bridges and replace them with a single, six-lane bridge.

The state has proposed a slew of changes on Pinckney Island, where 200,000 visitors explore the area’s salt marsh and tidal creeks every year.

Left turns off U.S. 278 would be eliminated under the SCDOT plan. More parking could be in store. And the C.C. Haigh Jr. boat ramp might be demolished and rebuilt further north, project documents show.

“We’ve very happy with the proposed option,” said refuge manager Russ Webb. “It seems like the best one for us.”

State officials want to reshape how visitors access the refuge. The Pinckney Island plan mirrors the road system on Hutchinson Island, which is just across the Georgia border near the Talmadge Bridge. (U.S. 17 crosses Hutchinson Island into Savannah.)

Left turns onto Pinckney Island would be eliminated. The highway would also be elevated. Currently, U.S. 278 is a causeway on the island.

The new elevation would allow SCDOT to build an underpass beneath the bridge. Eastbound drivers could use that underpass to eventually head north toward Pinckney Island’s trails and parking lot. Westbound drivers could use it to access the C.C. Haigh Jr. boat ramp and fishing pier.

A 10-foot-wide bicycle and running trail along the southern edge of the proposed six-lane bridge to Hilton Head would also cut east across Pinckney Island.

Webb, the refuge manager, said he likes the trail concept and thinks the elimination of left turns will make the area safer for guests.

Beaufort County has an agreement with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to use 6 acres on Pinckney Island for the C.C. Haigh Jr. boat landing, which is south of the existing U.S. 278 footprint.

Under SCDOT’s favored highway plan, or “preferred alternative,” U.S. 278 would shift south of its current route and run over the existing two-lane boat ramp.

The boat ramp, and an accompanying courtesy dock, would be demolished, project documents show. They may be rebuilt just to the north, where U.S. 278 currently crosses onto Pinckney Island.

That could allow boaters and others to park under the new bridge, said Jared Fralix, assistant county administrator.

“There will probably be more parking,” Fralix said. The county, at present, has roughly 90 spots for vehicles and trailers.

Details about the boat landing, though, remain up in the air.

Fralix said he expects SCDOT to demolish the current boat ramp and rebuild it to the north. The nearby fishing pier, he said, will probably be unaffected.

SCDOT project manager Craig Winn, though, in a Friday phone call said no plans for the boat landing have been finalized. SCDOT will continue to discuss the matter with Beaufort County, Winn said.

The parking lot north of U.S. 278 for hikers and bicyclists will not change under the state’s plan.

SCDOT wants to acquire another 8.02 acres for the highway’s right-of-way in the Pinckney Island area, which is a 4,053-acre refuge about 0.5 miles west of Hilton Head. The refuge was established in 1975.

The state would ultimately use about 32 acres, in total, for U.S. 278 on Pinckney Island. (That’s roughly 0.7% of refuge acreage.)

The proposed construction plan, a modified version of the state’s “alternative 4A,” would impact 22.9 acres of wetlands through the entire U.S. 278 corridor.

Five rejected “alternatives” (including the original version of alternative 4A) would have affected fewer wetland acres.

Four other alternatives, though, would have impacted more.

Jessie White, south coast office director for the Coastal Conservation League, previously said the organization was glad that state officials dropped the four plans that included additional wetland impacts.

Russ, the refuge manager, meanwhile, said he appreciated how SCDOT declined to pursue alternative 4. That plan would have pushed the proposed six-lane bridge south of the C.C. Haigh Jr. boat landing, subsequently impacting more of the refuge.

The details of SCDOT’s proposal for Pinckney Island will likely be among the least contentious aspects of the state’s $290 million construction plan.

Gullah land loss, intersection changes, lane widening and the project’s entire concept and timeline, as a whole, will be fiercely debated in the coming weeks.

The preferred alternative is currently in its 45-day public comment period, which ends Aug. 22.

Residents are now able to review the SCDOT documents online, submit written suggestions or recommendations to agency officials, attend an in-person public hearing on Thursday to discuss the preferred alternative, and set up appointments at the Island Recreation Center between Aug. 18 and Aug. 21 to learn more about the state’s proposal.

The public hearing will be held from 2 to 7 p.m. Thursday at the rec center at 20 Wilborn Road. People can drop by to ask questions from 2 to 6 p.m. An hour-long meeting for residents to speak out about the plan will run from 6 to 7 p.m.

Shawn Colin, senior adviser to Hilton Head’s town manager, expects state officials to ultimately spend two to three months responding to written comments from the public.

SCDOT could then release an updated version of its preferred alternative with tweaks or modifications this fall, he has said.

Paddle to the Death? Lowcountry history, beauty and challenges on Cuckolds Creek

Over the years we came to refer to the kayaking trip as “The Paddle to the Death.” In retrospect it was hard to imagine that a beautiful, idyllic stretch of Lowcountry waterway would evoke such a reaction among friends discussing a shared memory, but the feeling was real. The waterway I am referring to is the curiously named Cuckolds Creek and a stretch of the Combahee River. In many ways this passage is no different from any other river or creek in the region, but on the day my friends and I paddled it nearly 15 years ago, we we...

Over the years we came to refer to the kayaking trip as “The Paddle to the Death.” In retrospect it was hard to imagine that a beautiful, idyllic stretch of Lowcountry waterway would evoke such a reaction among friends discussing a shared memory, but the feeling was real. The waterway I am referring to is the curiously named Cuckolds Creek and a stretch of the Combahee River. In many ways this passage is no different from any other river or creek in the region, but on the day my friends and I paddled it nearly 15 years ago, we were woefully unprepared for conditions on the water.

That day, six friends and I departed the boat ramp on Cuckold’s Creek for a 6-mile paddle, planning to take out at “Steel Bridge” — now called “Harriet Tubman Bridge” — where the Coastal Highway crosses the Combahee River and the wide expanse of former rice field marsh. Most of the group was relatively new to paddling in the Lowcountry, and we misjudged several factors.

We misjudged the tide, little realizing the lunar and oceanic pull of the current. Some members were in whitewater boats not truly suited for long, stable paddling trips. At least two other friends were on crash diets and had not consumed enough fuel for a challenging kayak trip.

Instead of an enjoyable paddle that rolled with the tide and allowed us to leisurely take in the astoundingly beautiful scenery of a historic natural area, we ended up dragging ourselves to the landing, groaning and complaining, vowing never to speak of —much less paddle — this stretch of water again.

Where is this watery path of misery that you must avoid? You have doubtless noticed the brown sign on U.S. 17 between Beaufort and Charleston pointing out the location of a boat landing with the name “Cuckold’s Creek.” This takes you to the start of a 6-mile stretch of pristine Lowcountry creek that is bordered on all sides by historic plantation property, seemingly endless marsh and myriad birds, fish and alligators — and a beautiful journey on the water if you are prepared!

You may ask, what is with that name? “Cuckolds Creek” bespeaks of a curious, if not embarrassing origin. But a search of old records and online references to place names reveals…nothing. Island Packet Columnist Liz Farrell tackled this question a few years ago and found that instead of a salacious backstory of love and betrayal, the name may simply be a corruption or misspelling of another name: “Curcule Creek.” In the end, who knows? Like many things in the Lowcountry, this simple place has developed a legend, and this becomes part of the joy of life here.

When you explore Cuckolds Creek, you will experience a trip through yesteryear. From the launch at the landing near the rural community of White Hall, you are deep in the heart of former rice plantations. Red-winged blackbirds burst from the marsh, fish jump, and alligators watch you from the ruler-straight canals of former rice fields. As you descend the creek and its lazy bends, you will see “trunk gates,” where flooded land still provides a haven for waterfowl, and occasional piles of smooth, round ballast stones mark where the soft muddy banks were strengthened for schooners and flatboats. After several hours, you enter the wide current of the Combahee River where, close by the mouth of the creek, a pile of bricks and a rusted gear wheel reveal a former rice mill now in ruins — a symbol of a war for freedom from slavery and the lost cause of the plantation South.

A long bend in the Combahee River marks your final stretch, and you will notice the sound of cars passing on U.S. 17 in the distance, across a vast, channeled field of marsh. Passages through this march can allow a very scenic alternate route to the take out, and it’s worth trying if conditions are right — meaning if the abundant alligators can be avoided.

I recently returned to undertake the “Paddle to the Death” again with my group of friends. By timing the tide right and being well prepared, we had a very enjoyable kayak trip. During the last mile on the Combahee, a massive thunderstorm erupted in a menacing wall of cloud and rain across the marsh, turning the river into a froth of raindrops and blasts of warm summer wind. The Lowcountry had decided to play a trick on us for old times’ sake and remind us of the power of the beautiful natural world around us that we love so much — and can too often take for granted.

Cuckolds Creek Landing is on Cuckold Creek Road, Green Pond, S.C. It is well maintained with a concrete ramp and small parking area. Harriet Tubman Bridge/Steel Bridge Landing is located on U.S. 17 where the Coastal Highway crosses the Combahee River between Beaufort and Colleton counties. This large landing has two ramps and a dock, as well as temporary restroom facilities. Both landings are open year round, dawn to dusk.

If you wish to paddle Cuckolds Creek along the route I have described, proper planning requires an understanding of tide and weather conditions. This can include a descent of the creek on the outgoing tide or a launch at Harriet Tubman Bridge for an ascent of the creek on an incoming tide. Either passage will reveal beautiful scenery and fascinating history and provide an unforgettable experience on the water — I hope in a good way!

Enjoy these upcoming performances and art gallery shows around Beaufort County

Our possibilities in the cultural arts continue to grow toward pre-pandemic conditions. I have recently joined crowds of arts enthusiasts as we weave our way through welcoming gallery spaces or are seated in concert and theater venues. Many consider an upturn in arts and entertainment to be a kind of bellwether to the way things were or the way we choose to remember them. Here are a few arts and culture updates: Famed Lowcountry artist Louanne LaRoch...

Our possibilities in the cultural arts continue to grow toward pre-pandemic conditions. I have recently joined crowds of arts enthusiasts as we weave our way through welcoming gallery spaces or are seated in concert and theater venues. Many consider an upturn in arts and entertainment to be a kind of bellwether to the way things were or the way we choose to remember them.

Here are a few arts and culture updates:

Famed Lowcountry artist Louanne LaRoche has brought her own distinctive vision to the Lowcountry. Known as a colorist for more than 30 years, she has combined her freedom of expression with her strength of representation.

LaRoche continues to experiment, exploring the relationships of color and texture. Her work has included Lowcountry settings or personal glimpses of times well-spent in Belize. Swimming and water references have been at the top of her past work, and her renderings of oystermen and shrimp boats in charcoal have captured everyone’s imagination.

LaRoche’s new work is a brilliant piece. The completely captivating, large-scale “Bird Land” is on view at Camellia Art, Fine Art Gallery and Framing, on Hilton Head’s south end. Her work may also be viewed locally at Camellia Art inside Banks Design mid-island and also on Calhoun Street in Bluffton. A dramatic departure from her earlier work, this 48-inch by 48-inch mixed-media piece in charcoal on canvas and crayon is breathtaking. In surprisingly brilliant greens, yellows and blues, it will stop you in your tracks.

“I think of birds and bird cages a bit like notes on a musical scale,” she shared, “or even a little like the improvisation I associate with jazz.”

LaRoche was born and raised in Pittsburgh and has been living in the South Carolina Lowcountry since the late 70s. Many associate her as the owner and director of The Red Piano Gallery on Hilton Head from 1980 until 1995. She founded the Red Piano, Too Gallery on St. Helena Island in 1991 and served as a board member of Penn Community Center on St. Helena.

“Fripp Island Friends of Music may be one of the longest running charitable institutions in Northern Beaufort County … that no one’s heard of,” commented Rick Stein, president of the Fripp Island Friends of Music. ”Prior to last season, canceled due to Covid-19, we were up to 36 seasons!”

The Fripp Island Friends of Music offers concerts of high-quality, world-acclaimed artists in a wide variety of genres. Their nonprofit status is due to their main mission of bringing high-quality music to students in the area. After a Sunday performance in the chapel of the Fripp Island Community Center, the artists present a mini-concert at an area school on Monday morning. The organization also supports the Beaufort Youth Symphony Orchestra financially and by offering musical trios or quartets to open some of their performances.

The upcoming season will feature: Hotlanta Dixieland Jazz, Oct. 17; Tom Knific Trio, Nov. 14; pianist John Sawoski with vocalist Michele Patzakis, Jan. 30; Appalatin, Feb. 27; Kyshona Trio, March 27; and singer/songwriter Rebecca Folsom, April 24.

More info: www.frippfriendsofmusic.com

I’m looking forward to the Gershwin musical comedy “Crazy for You” by the Southeastern Summer Theatre Institute. The all-new production, seen to by Joe Barrros, will feature performers who were auditioned in by SSTI professional staff as performing artists or as members of the crew. Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. July 30-31 and Aug. 6-7; and 1 p.m. Aug. 1 and Aug. 8 at Seahawk Cultural Center, 70 Wilborn Road, Hilton Head.

Tickets: www.hhisummermusicals.com or 866-749-2228

“Mamma Mia!” continues through Aug. 22 at the Arts Center of Coastal Carolina.

Tickets: www.artshhi.com or 843-842-2287

Leadership at the Main Stage Community Theatre (formerly Main Street Youth Theatre), which had a completely successful run of “Seussical the Musical” earlier this summer, shared that they are beyond excited to be back with not only a new name but a new vision, purpose and commitment to the community.

“Legacy Gullah Homecoming” showcases St. Helena artist Lisa Rivers’ in a bright and colorful homage to life in the South at Hilton Head’s Art League Gallery inside the Arts Center of Coastal Carolina at 14 Shelter Cove Lane.

The exhibit is Aug. 3-28. An artist’s reception is from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 11. An artist demo is at 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 7. RSVP for the reception and demonstration at gallery@artleaguehhi.org.

Organist JooSoo Son will present an American Guild of Organists recital at noon Aug. 13 at Providence Presbyterian Church, 171 Cordillo Parkway on Hilton Head. She has been the traditional music director and organist at the church since 2012.

Hilton Head bridge project was expected to cost $272M. Why is it now $290M?

The estimated price tag for the sprawling U.S. 278 corridor project was roughly $272 million last summer. But a year later, the S.C. Department of Transportation’s favored construction plan for the highway, or “preferred alternative,” is now expected to cost almost ...

The estimated price tag for the sprawling U.S. 278 corridor project was roughly $272 million last summer.

But a year later, the S.C. Department of Transportation’s favored construction plan for the highway, or “preferred alternative,” is now expected to cost almost $290 million.

What happened?

Craig Winn, the state’s project manager, provided some clarification in a Wednesday phone call.

As part of the project, Winn said, the state initially planned to use $43.5 million in SCDOT bridge replacement funds to address U.S. 278’s deficient eastbound lanes over Mackay Creek.

The transportation agency, though, later amended its estimate and projected that $65.5 million in bridge replacement funds were actually needed for its proposal to demolish the existing Hilton Head Island bridges and replace them with a single, six-lane bridge, Winn said.

The bridge replacement funds, he said, are specifically set aside to address the eastbound lanes over Mackay Creek.

SCDOT increased its cost estimate because the state drilled holes into the earth below U.S. 278 to determine how deep the newly proposed bridge foundation would have to go to meet South Carolina’s current seismic design standards, among other things, Winn said.

“The depths have not been finalized as bridge design is in (a) conceptual stage,” Winn wrote in a follow-up text message.

But SCDOT does know that the foundation will have to be deeper than it is now, Winn said.

The state’s seismic design standards were first created in 2001 so SCDOT could better prepare bridges to weather earthquakes, Winn said.

The existing Hilton Head bridge system was built in 1982 when the James F. Byrnes swing bridge was replaced. That means the current bridges do not meet SCDOT’s seismic standards, Winn said. The proposed six-lane bridge would meet those standards, he said.

The addition of a 10-foot-wide pathway for runners and bicyclists along the proposed bridge also affected SCDOT’s estimated need for bridge replacement funds, Winn added.

The project’s other funding sources have not changed over the past year, according to Beaufort County.

Jared Fralix, assistant county administrator, told The Island Packet that the entire project will be funded with:

Roughly $292 million in funding has been secured for the project, Fralix said.

Residents are able to review SCDOT’s preferred alternative documents online, submit written suggestions or recommendations to agency officials, attend an in-person public hearing on Thursday to discuss the preferred alternative, and set up appointments at the Island Recreation Center between Aug. 18 and Aug. 21 to learn more about the state’s proposal.

The public hearing will be held from 2 to 7 p.m. Thursday at the rec center at 20 Wilborn Road. People can drop by to ask questions from 2 to 6 p.m. An hour-long meeting for residents to speak out about the plan will run from 6 to 7 p.m.

Our COVID-19 reporter has covered the virus for a year. Help The Island Packet fund his work

Hi, Beaufort and Jasper counties. My name is Sam Ogozalek, and for the past year I’ve been covering COVID-19 as a Report for America corps member at The Island Packet. It’s been an honor to serve all of you during the pandemic. I fielded dozens of your calls about the confounding rollout of coronavirus vaccines, helpin...

Hi, Beaufort and Jasper counties.

My name is Sam Ogozalek, and for the past year I’ve been covering COVID-19 as a Report for America corps member at The Island Packet.

It’s been an honor to serve all of you during the pandemic.

I fielded dozens of your calls about the confounding rollout of coronavirus vaccines, helping you navigate the byzantine network of sign-up systems in the early days of South Carolina’s inoculation campaign.

I tracked and analyzed our area’s vaccination rates, case trends, deaths, hospital occupancy figures, pandemic loans, federal coronavirus contracts and much more.

I reported on the state’s failure to quickly implement a program to inoculate our homebound seniors. (South Carolina’s public health agency later rectified that issue.)

And I wrote about how our lives were reshaped and turned upside down throughout 2020: The Crazy Crab server who became a COVID-19 “long-hauler.” The fight to keep Park Plaza Cinema afloat. The families who struggled to pay electric bills due to layoffs and furloughs.

My job, though, is not done just yet in 2021. And we need your help to continue this journalism.

There’s still much more to report on during South Carolina’s slow recovery from COVID-19, including the Lowcountry’s economic damage and how the pandemic has affected our affordability crisis.

The Island Packet is using its philanthropic partnership with Report for America to bolster our newsroom’s coverage of COVID-19 and local livability issues.

We rely on your support to fund my position. Make a tax-deductible gift to The Island Packet today to help me continue this work.

You can make a donation online here: www.islandpacket.com/donate

If you would prefer to send a check, please make it payable to “Journalism Funding Partners” or “JFP” with “Island Packet” on the memo line. If you provide us with an email address, we can send you a tax donation letter confirming your gift.

Checks should be mailed to: McClatchy, PO Box 15779, Sacramento CA, 95852.

Thank you for your support and continued readership.

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