Trademark Attorney in James Island, SC

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At Sausser Summers, PC, our goal is to make the trademark registration process as straightforward and cost-effective as possible, so that you can focus on growing your business while we take the necessary steps to protect what you have worked so hard to build.

Unlike other law firms, Sausser Summers, PC provides flat fee trademark services at an affordable price. Our goal is to eliminate the uncertainty that comes with hourly work, so you know exactly how much your total expenses will be at the outset of our relationship.

With a BBB A+ rating, we are consistently ranked as one of the top trademark law firms in the U.S. We aim to provide you with the same five-star service that you would receive from large firms, with a modern twist at a rate that won’t break the bank.

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How Sausser Summers, PC Flat Fee Trademark Service Works

Our flat fee trademark process is simple, streamlined, and consists of three steps:

Our three-step process lets you:

Trademark Services at a Glance

Whether you need help maintaining your current trademark or require assistance canceling an abandoned mark, Sausser Summers, PC is here to help. Here are just a few of the trademark services that we provide to clients:

Comprehensive Trademark Search

For many entrepreneurs, this is the first and most crucial step to take when it’s time to safeguard your business and intellectual property. Your trademark attorney in James Island will conduct a thorough search of the USPTO Federal Trademark Database and each U.S state’s trademark database. We will also perform a trademark domain name search and a trademark common law search on your behalf. We will follow up with a 30-minute phone call, where we will discuss the results of our trademark search and send you a drafted legal opinion letter.

U.S. Trademark Filing

Once your trademark lawyer in James Island has completed a comprehensive trademark search, the next step is to file a trademark application. We will submit your application within 1-3 business days and keep you updated on its USPTO status throughout the registration process.

U.S Trademark Office Actions – These actions are essentially initial rejections of your trademark by the USPTO. Applicants have six months in which to respond to this rejection. For a flat fee, your trademark lawyer from Sausser Summers, PC will compose

U.S Trademark Renewal

If you already own a trademark, Sausser Summers, PC will renew your registered trademark so that it remains current. Extended protection varies depending on how long you have held your trademark. We encourage you to visit our U.S Trademark Renewal page to find out which renewal service best fits your current situation.

U.S. Trademark Cease & Desist

Whether you have been accused of infringing on someone’s trademark and received a cease and desist letter or have found an infringer on your own mark, it is imperative that you respond. If you have received a letter and do not respond, you might be sued. If you find an infringer and do not demand that they stop, you may lose your trademark rights. To discuss the best course of action for your situation, we recommend you contact Sausser Summers, PC, for a risk-free consultation at no additional cost. Once you speak directly to one of our attorneys, we will send your cease and desist letter or respond to the one you have received for an affordable flat fee.

Statement of Use

If you plan on using your mark in commerce, you must file a Statement of Use to notify the USPTO. This filing must take place six months after you receive your Notice of Allowance. For an affordable flat-rate fee, your trademark attorney in James Island will make any requisite filings on your behalf. Before you decide on a course of action, we encourage you to contact our office at (843) 654-0078 to speak with one of our attorneys. This consultation will help us get a better understanding of your situation and is always free and confidential.

U.S. Trademark Filing of Name and Logo

I Have a Word Mark & Logo!

*USPTO filing fee of $250 for one international class is included, as mentioned above. Additional fees will apply if multiple classes. If you have any questions about the total cost please contact us prior to submitting this form.

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Latest News in James Island, SC

Satirical Facebook post brings attention to Fort Johnson renovation

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A Facebook post got a lot of attention after making false claims about the Fort Johnson and May Forest renovation project.The post, which was created on Friday, got over 400 comments from upset and confused residents. It was created by the group “Charleston Municipality,” they made claims that the project is about international shipping and passenger cruise ships. They said on Saturday in a statement that “the post was obviously very satirical.”State Representative Spencer Wet...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A Facebook post got a lot of attention after making false claims about the Fort Johnson and May Forest renovation project.

The post, which was created on Friday, got over 400 comments from upset and confused residents. It was created by the group “Charleston Municipality,” they made claims that the project is about international shipping and passenger cruise ships. They said on Saturday in a statement that “the post was obviously very satirical.”

State Representative Spencer Wetmore says seeing the Facebook post and reactions from the public was heartbreaking.

“This is a project that we were really proud of,” Wetmore says. “I sort of understood the assignment here that people do not want to see a whole bunch of new development. People are concerned about flooding or concerned about traffic. To me, I certainly don’t want to see a bunch of houses and development there either. The people that made this post are obviously playing on people’s fears of that.”

The real Fort Johnson and May Forest renovation project started in March of 2022 and its goal is to tie together history, nature, research and environmental preservation.

The land on James Island is home to many different historical artifacts dating back to the late 1700′s. For the project to take place, a few old buildings will be torn down to make room for the renovations.

James Island Town Councilman Garrett Milliken says the stakeholders worked hard to keep history and rising sea levels in mind during the planning process.

“While the public might have been restricted with access to these locations in the past, the future will actually invite the public to enjoy the rich history of this location that will be in concordance with the research mission of this area as well,” Milliken says. “Both things are going to happen simultaneously at this location. So, I think it’s a win, win for both perspectives, history and research.”

Currently, the area is home to research for the Department of Natural Resources, the College of Charleston and the Marine Research Institute. All of their work will continue to move forward at the location after renovations take place.

“It really is the jewel of James Island,” Milliken says. “It has so much history, so much ecological significance. And frankly, the views are spectacular.”

The project website contains detailed maps and plans of what the entire area of Fort Johnson and May Forest should look like in the future. Despite the drama surrounding the Facebook post, Wetmore hopes the community becomes more aware about the actual project taking place.

“I just hope people will get excited about the park,” she says. “I know this Facebook post is just, honestly, just a mean joke.”

The “Charleston Municipality” Facebook group released the following statement on the post:

The post regarding the James Island Global Gateway Terminal was obviously very satirical, as it was intended being that Charleston Municipality is a satirical Facebook page. The main goal behind the post was to bring awareness to the rampant overdevelopment of not only James Island, but the entire Lowcountry, largely at the hands of our local elected officials and review boards. The post angered so many people, and those people are ready to put up a fight against this project. We want the same collective passion from everyone for all the development that is ACTUALLY taking place all around us. This “huge” and impactful project easily got peoples attention, but everyone needs to pay attention to all the projects that take place, as they are directly and negatively impacting our daily lives, largely due to a seemingly lack of oversight and shady deals being given to developers on a daily basis. Everyone must stay vigilant, and fight to preserve what we have before we have no more.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Proposed redistricting maps could unite Johns Island under one district

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The redistricting process for the city of Charleston is well underway, and Tuesday night the City Council and the public will review potential renderings for the new districts.Some Johns Islanders are advocating for Johns Island to be all one district, and for the first time in Charleston’s history, there is a potential it could be.Peter Rubino, a re...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The redistricting process for the city of Charleston is well underway, and Tuesday night the City Council and the public will review potential renderings for the new districts.

Some Johns Islanders are advocating for Johns Island to be all one district, and for the first time in Charleston’s history, there is a potential it could be.

Peter Rubino, a resident of Johns Island, says the original draft from the city split Johns Island into three districts.

Through email campaigns and spreading awareness, he and other advocates were able to get it down to two districts, and after tonight, hopefully, one.

“If you don’t speak up, then you’re not going to get what you need,” Rubino said.

He said having all of Johns Island in one district would give Johns Islanders a real say in their future, and true influence in city decisions.

He said he wants the person who represents Johns Island to live on Johns Island, with the hope that the shared experiences of the island will lead to more impactful decision making.

“We want someone who’s going to live here, and understands the issues, what the desires are of the people who live here and have to put up with the traffic and the growth and all of those things. Because if you don’t live here, you don’t see all those things that are going on,” Rubino said.

Tuesday night, he, along with other advocates, plan to attend the City Council Meeting to continue the fight for one district.

The city of Charleston’s Chief Innovation Officer Tracy Mckee said two scenarios will be presented tonight.

She said the first one prioritizes minimizing change, but splits Johns Island into two districts.

“In that scenario, Johns Island has two representatives, but each of those representatives also represent parts of West Ashley as well as James Island,” McKee said.

She said the second, which keeps Johns Island under one district, prioritizes compactness and communities of interest.

In that scenario, Johns Island has only one representative.

Regardless, Mckee says the City is doing its best to listen to the public and accommodate their desires.

“We have made a really good effort to get public opinion this time and bake that opinion into our plans as much as possible,” Mckee said.

As of now, Johns Island is a part of a larger district in West Ashley. Up until this redistricting, it did not have the population to be its own district.

Tuesday’s meeting is at 5 p.m. at the Charleston City Hall at 80 Broad Street. Rubino encourages those passionate about redistricting on Johns Island to sign up to speak.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Newly proposed Charleston City Council districts give Johns Island its own representative

After a decade of booming population growth, Johns Island may get its own representative on Charleston City Council.But making that change could cost a sitting council member their seat.The island is now in District 5, which also spans much of outer West Ashley. It is represented by Councilman Karl Brady, who lives in West Ashley.Two newly proposed City Council district maps...

After a decade of booming population growth, Johns Island may get its own representative on Charleston City Council.

But making that change could cost a sitting council member their seat.

The island is now in District 5, which also spans much of outer West Ashley. It is represented by Councilman Karl Brady, who lives in West Ashley.

Two newly proposed City Council district maps make Johns Island its own district without any extension into West Ashley. That means the City Council member to represent it would have to live on Johns Island.

"There is no one on council right now that drives our roads every day, sends their kids to school here, works here or lives here," said John Zlogar, chairman of the Johns Island Task Force.

The group was established in 2013 to bring together residents and local officials to address Johns Island-specific issues.

While Zlogar said he has no issue with Brady, he said he would like to have a council member who can put their sole focus on the island.

"We will feel like we have someone that has our voice," he said.

The island, which is partially within the city of Charleston and partially within unincorporated Charleston County, has deep roots in agriculture and the city's Black history. Several Black family farms have run their businesses on the island since Reconstruction, when formerly enslaved laborers took over former plantations.

An "urban growth boundary," established across the island limits where agricultural land must be protected and where development is allowed. Most of the city's side of the island is located within the urban growth boundary and as a result has seen a massive influx of residents looking for a lower cost of living than the city's core. Between 2010 and 2020, District 5, the district with Johns Island and West Ashley, grew a staggering 154 percent.

The redistricting process

Charleston Chief Innovation Officer Tracy McKee has led the city through the redistricting process three times in her career. Factoring in population growth between 2010 and 2020, McKee and city staff have been in the process of redrawing the council district boundaries for months.

"Four council members live on the peninsula, but we've had more growth in Berkeley County on Daniel Island and on Johns Island," McKee said.

Every 10 years, the U.S. Census Bureau releases new population and demographic data that governments use to redraw voting districts. In 2020, it was delayed because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

City Council voted last summer to delay redistricting until after the fall 2021 election.

Officials try to balance the population size of each district as well as their geographic spread. In Charleston, for example, it would be impractical to include Daniel Island and outer West Ashley in the same district.

Initially, city staff put out one proposal in July. That plan kept all sitting council members within their current districts. None of them were at risk of losing their seat or having to run against each other to keep their seat. But the proposal split Johns island into three districts that included other areas of the city as well.

The map was met with some criticism for the wide span of geography each district covered. Districts were stretched from the peninsula far into West Ashley and District 11, covered parts of West Ashley, James Island and Johns Island.

The League of Women Voters published a commentary in The Post and Courier calling for more compact districts.

"Drawing districts to protect incumbents means the maps defy logic in many places. James Island remains divided into three different districts, one with very dubious contiguity as it crosses briefly over West Ashley and onto the peninsula. Johns Island, now all in District 5, will be divided into three different districts, diluting the voices of those residents," the league wrote.

The league now supports the new proposals, mainly because the districts don't stretch as far across the city.

"They keep communities together. These really prioritize citizen interests," said Leslie Skardon, the director of advocacy for the League of Women Voters.

Impact to incumbents

On Aug. 28, city staff unveiled two alternative maps that took some of that feedback into consideration. The two new maps, referred to as 1A and 1B, are almost identical except for their effects on two current peninsula districts.

Both maps make Johns Island its own district.

To create the Johns Island district, city staff proposed two options. They can move District 3 or District 6 off of the West Side of the peninsula to only cover West Ashley. If District 3 moves off, District 6 will absorb the portion of the West Side that is currently in District 3.

Because District 3 Councilman Jason Sakran lives on the peninsula, he would be drawn out of his district. He would have to run for District 6 against fellow Councilman William Dudley Gregorie. But that seat is not up for election until 2025. In the meantime, depending on when council decides to make the maps effective, a special election would determine who represents the new West Ashley-only version of District 3.

The other scenario would be that District 6 would move off of its portion of the West Side of the peninsula. In that case, Gregorie, who lives also in the West Side, would be drawn into Councilman Sakran's District 3. Because District 3 is up for election in 2023, the two would face off sooner.

Sakran said he would be OK with running against Gregorie in 2023, but he is most favorable of the original map that keeps all council members in their respective districts.

"You are overhauling peoples' elected representatives to the tune of 40 percent of the city's population," Sakran said of the new proposals.

According to the city, if the original proposal is accepted, about 30 percent of the city's population will end up in new council districts. If either of the alternatives are chosen, that number will move up to 39 percent.

Another factor in the process is the establishment of minority-majority districts. Districts 4 and 7 on the all three map proposals are majority-minority districts. They cover the upper peninsula and part of West Ashley, respectively. When the maps were last redrawn in 2010, the city went from having five majority-minority districts to three. Now the city is guaranteed to have two. As demographics shift, it's difficult to group minority voters together and ensure their voice is in the majority in any part of the city, McKee said.

City Council will review the map proposals at its Sept. 13 meeting. No action will be taken. A public hearing will be held in the fall. Residents can view the maps and leave comments online the city's redistricting "Open Town Hall" webpage at www.charleston-sc.gov/Redistricting2020. Email comments are accepted at redistricting@charleston-sc.gov.

Dutch Fork, South Pointe and Daniel among top teams in Week 4 SC Prep Football Media Poll

This week, not much changed. The media voted again to see who the top 10 teams in each of the five SCHSL classifications are and largely, at least in the No. 1 spots, it remained the same from a week ago.Hillcrest received one first-place vote in Class AAAAA, Spar...

This week, not much changed. The media voted again to see who the top 10 teams in each of the five SCHSL classifications are and largely, at least in the No. 1 spots, it remained the same from a week ago.

Hillcrest received one first-place vote in Class AAAAA, Spartanburg dropped out of the Top 10 in AAAAA surprisingly. And other teams shifted from last week's poll. In parentheses is the amount of No. 1 votes a team received. If a team moved in to a ranking, up or down, it is noted below. Teams that are ranked the same as last week will not have anything next to their name.

Class AAAAA

1. Dutch Fork (19)

2. Byrnes

3. Hillcrest (1)

4. Dorman

5. Sumter (Last week: 6th)

6. Summerville (Last week: 8th)

7. River Bluff (Last week: 10th)

8. Fort Dorchester (Last week: 5th)

9. White Knoll (Last week: NR, receiving votes)

10. Lexington (Last week: NR, receiving votes)

Others receiving votes: Spartanburg, TL Hanna, Gaffney West Ashley, Clover JL Mann, Chapin

Game story: How four-star Mazeo Bennett, defense and QB play helped Greenville football soar past Mauldin

Class AAAA

1. South Pointe (17)

2. Northwestern (3)

3. AC Flora

4. South Florence

5. West Florence

6. Catawba Ridge (Last week: 7th)

7. Indian Land (Last week: 9th)

8. Hartsville (Last week: 6th)

9. James Island (Last week: 8th)

10. Ridge View

Others receiving votes: Westside, Irmo, Lancaster, Wilson, Greenville, York, Myrtle Beach

Class AAA

1. Daniel (19)

2. Dillon (1)

3. Powdersville

4. Clinton (Last week: 5th)

5. Gilbert (Last week: 6th)

6. Beaufort (Last week: 8th)

7. Camden (Last week: 4th)

8. Hanahan (Last week: 9th)

9. Belton-Honea Path (Last week: 10th)

10. Seneca (Last week: 7th)

Others receiving votes: Loris, Philip Simmons, Chester, Union County, Aynor, Manning, Marlboro County, Emerald, Woodruff

Class AA

1. Saluda (15)

2. Oceanside Collegiate (2, Last week: 4th)

3. Barnwell (3)

4. Abbeville (Last week: 2nd, two first-place votes)

5. Wade Hampton (Last week: 6th)

6. Buford (Last week: 7th)

7. Woodland (Last week: 8th)

8. Marion (Last week: 9th)

9. Gray Collegiate (Last week: NR, receiving votes)

10. Fairfield Central (Last week: 5th)

Others receiving votes: Andrews, Pelion, Lake Marion, Strom Thurmond, Academic Magnet, Andrew Jackson, Silver Bluff, Cheraw

Class A

1. St. Joseph’s (15)

2. Bamberg-Ehrhardt (2, Last week: 3rd)

3. Johnsonville (1, Last week: 4th)

4. Whale Branch (Last week: 2nd)

5. Lewisville (1)

6. Christ Church

7. Lake View (1, Last week: 10th)

8. Baptist Hill

9. Southside Christian

10. Lamar (Last week: 7th)

Others receiving votes: Calhoun County, McBee, Latta, Estill, Hunter-Kinard-Tyler, Denmark-Olar

Iron Horses trample Timberland; Bishops blanked by James Island

There were questions about the Philip Simmons High School quarterback position at the beginning of the 2022 football season. But Tavien Orellana has proven to be the answer.Orellana completed 12 of 19 passing for 146 yards and a touchdown last Friday night to lead the Iron Horses to a 31-12 victory over Berkeley County rival Timberland on a rainy night. Game conditions were what W.C. Fields might describe as “not fit for man or beast.”Orellana’s experience heading into the campaign was limited, although he com...

There were questions about the Philip Simmons High School quarterback position at the beginning of the 2022 football season. But Tavien Orellana has proven to be the answer.

Orellana completed 12 of 19 passing for 146 yards and a touchdown last Friday night to lead the Iron Horses to a 31-12 victory over Berkeley County rival Timberland on a rainy night. Game conditions were what W.C. Fields might describe as “not fit for man or beast.”

Orellana’s experience heading into the campaign was limited, although he completed all six passes he attempted last fall as a backup to four-year starter Tripp Williams, who owns all the major offensive records for a season and career.

“We had a coaches’ meeting and that was the consensus – Tavien is the answer,” Philip Simmons coach Eric Bendig said after his team gained its second victory in a row to improve to 3-1. “He does a good job. He’s a hard worker who puts his head down and gets the job done.”

Orellana, a 5-11 sophomore, has completed 36 of 60 passing for 516 yards and six touchdowns. He’s shown improvement every game and has the skills, energy and mindset to be a force for the Iron Horses.

But winning teams are balanced, and that’s part of the Iron Horses’ equation as they posted their 14th victory in their last 17 games. The Iron Horses were able to average 6.1 yards per carry against a Timberland defense, which has a history of shutting down teams. The

Iron Horses topped 200 yards rushing for the second straight game, finishing with 221 yards on 36 carries.

Junior running back Markellis “KJ” Asbury proved to be electric, carrying 12 times for 139 yards. He had a 53-yard touchdown run and finished with 12.6 yards per carry.

While Asbury was Mr. Outside, classmate Isaac Schimpf was Mr. Inside, finishing with 61 yards and a pair of short touchdown runs on 15 carries.

The offense has shown great balance in four games. Orellana has passed for 516 yards throwing only one interception. The running game has churned and burned foes for 843 yards as the offensive line continues to control the line of scrimmage.

The defense was dominant against a Wolves’ offense that has scored only 24 points this fall. Devontay McNeil led the Iron Horses with nine tackles, including six solo stops. He recorded a tackle for a loss. Defensive tackle Tyshawn Green tallied eight tackles, including four for a loss. Senior linebacker Chip Carlson also logged eight tackles.

The Iron Horses host Aynor this Friday. The Blue Jackets are 2-1.

Bishop England, meanwhile, dropped its third straight game after blanking Porter-Gaud in the season-opener. The Bishops were on the wrong end of a 23-0 decision against undefeated James Island, which has allowed only six points in four games.

James Island took a 14-0 lead at the end of the first quarter and never looked back against the Bishops, who have scored only 17 points in their last three games.

The Bishops host Woodland on Friday. The Wolverines are 3-0.

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