Trademark Attorney in John's Island, SC

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At Sausser Summers, PC, our goal is to make the trademark registration process as straightforward and cost-effective as possible, so that you can focus on growing your business while we take the necessary steps to protect what you have worked so hard to build.

Unlike other law firms, Sausser Summers, PC provides flat fee trademark services at an affordable price. Our goal is to eliminate the uncertainty that comes with hourly work, so you know exactly how much your total expenses will be at the outset of our relationship.

With a BBB A+ rating, we are consistently ranked as one of the top trademark law firms in the U.S. We aim to provide you with the same five-star service that you would receive from large firms, with a modern twist at a rate that won’t break the bank.

Service Areas

How Sausser Summers, PC Flat Fee Trademark Service Works

Our flat fee trademark process is simple, streamlined, and consists of three steps:

Our three-step process lets you:

Trademark Services at a Glance

Whether you need help maintaining your current trademark or require assistance canceling an abandoned mark, Sausser Summers, PC is here to help. Here are just a few of the trademark services that we provide to clients:

Comprehensive Trademark Search

For many entrepreneurs, this is the first and most crucial step to take when it’s time to safeguard your business and intellectual property. Your trademark attorney in John's Island will conduct a thorough search of the USPTO Federal Trademark Database and each U.S state’s trademark database. We will also perform a trademark domain name search and a trademark common law search on your behalf. We will follow up with a 30-minute phone call, where we will discuss the results of our trademark search and send you a drafted legal opinion letter.

U.S. Trademark Filing

Once your trademark lawyer in John's Island has completed a comprehensive trademark search, the next step is to file a trademark application. We will submit your application within 1-3 business days and keep you updated on its USPTO status throughout the registration process.

U.S Trademark Office Actions – These actions are essentially initial rejections of your trademark by the USPTO. Applicants have six months in which to respond to this rejection. For a flat fee, your trademark lawyer from Sausser Summers, PC will compose

U.S Trademark Renewal

If you already own a trademark, Sausser Summers, PC will renew your registered trademark so that it remains current. Extended protection varies depending on how long you have held your trademark. We encourage you to visit our U.S Trademark Renewal page to find out which renewal service best fits your current situation.

U.S. Trademark Cease & Desist

Whether you have been accused of infringing on someone’s trademark and received a cease and desist letter or have found an infringer on your own mark, it is imperative that you respond. If you have received a letter and do not respond, you might be sued. If you find an infringer and do not demand that they stop, you may lose your trademark rights. To discuss the best course of action for your situation, we recommend you contact Sausser Summers, PC, for a risk-free consultation at no additional cost. Once you speak directly to one of our attorneys, we will send your cease and desist letter or respond to the one you have received for an affordable flat fee.

Statement of Use

If you plan on using your mark in commerce, you must file a Statement of Use to notify the USPTO. This filing must take place six months after you receive your Notice of Allowance. For an affordable flat-rate fee, your trademark attorney in John's Island will make any requisite filings on your behalf. Before you decide on a course of action, we encourage you to contact our office at (843) 654-0078 to speak with one of our attorneys. This consultation will help us get a better understanding of your situation and is always free and confidential.

U.S. Trademark Filing of Name and Logo

I Have a Word Mark & Logo!

*USPTO filing fee of $250 for one international class is included, as mentioned above. Additional fees will apply if multiple classes. If you have any questions about the total cost please contact us prior to submitting this form.

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Latest News in John's Island

Editorial: Charleston should seize chance to protect low-lying Johns Island land

As Charleston got serious about its threats from flooding and sea level rise, it launched the Dutch Dialogues to develop a road map showing how it could and should adapt and prepare for the future. Chief among those steps was a smart new zoning policy to guide development away from low-lying land and toward properties far less likely to flood.This idea has been fleshed out further during work on Charleston’s new comprehensive plan, and we urge the city to begin revamping its zoning code soon to codify this new elevation-based ap...

As Charleston got serious about its threats from flooding and sea level rise, it launched the Dutch Dialogues to develop a road map showing how it could and should adapt and prepare for the future. Chief among those steps was a smart new zoning policy to guide development away from low-lying land and toward properties far less likely to flood.

This idea has been fleshed out further during work on Charleston’s new comprehensive plan, and we urge the city to begin revamping its zoning code soon to codify this new elevation-based approach. But even before that happens, a pending conservation deal on Johns Island would mark an important step toward the larger goal. Both the city and the county should approve it.

The deal involves about 100 acres recently purchased for the Charleston Executive Airport on Johns Island — where a 242-home development known as River Run had been proposed. The Charleston County Aviation Authority closed on the site this summer.

While the airport’s purchase ends the immediate threat of development, it does not guarantee there will be no development there in the long run. That’s why the Lowcountry Land Trust and the city of Charleston plan to seek $500,000 from the city’s share of Charleston County greenbelt funds to place a permanent easement on 94 acres of the site. City Council is expected to vote this month on making the application, and council members should give it the green light.

The S.C. Conservation Bank already has granted the Land Trust $500,000 toward the conservation easement purchase; the aviation authority would receive $1 million total, only 25% of the easement’s total value.

Dale Morris, the city’s new resiliency director, toured the River Run site while consulting on the city’s Dutch Dialogue process and its more recent Charleston City Plan Land and Water Analysis. He found its low elevation — much of the land is 6 feet above sea level or lower — made it an unwise place to build. Leaving it alone would allow the marsh along the Stono River to migrate gradually landward as sea levels rise.

Of course, airport officials were interested in the land to ensure the airport has an adequate buffer between any future expansion and neighboring development, and that’s a sensible, forward-thinking move. Regardless of what happens with the airport, this conservation deal would be an important piece of ensuring that no flood-prone development ever occurs there. The easement would allow some minimal future public access, such as a nature trail or kayak launch.

The Historic Charleston Foundation, which helped sponsor the Dutch Dialogues, feels strongly that the easement deal would be a win-win and is also urging City Council to allocate $500,000 of its greenbelt funds. Additionally, we would urge the Greenbelt Advisory Board and County Council to approve it as well.

It’s easy to say that future development should not occur in the city’s low-lying areas, but actually preventing it is much more difficult. Many property owners are invested in land that they want their families to profit from one day, and much of our current zoning gives them the right to expect just that.

It’s true that zoning can and should be changed, but the work of guiding development away from these places also must address these owners’ interests — not necessarily by giving them all the profit they once might have hoped for but certainly not expecting them to bear a disproportionate share of the whole cost to make our community more resilient.

Accomplishing all that will take negotiation and hard work, and this Johns Island easement deal marks a hopeful first step toward that.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Khris Middleton, Aaron Nesmith return to Charleston roots

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Porter-Gaud grads Khris Middleton and Aaron Nesmith have done a million and one things since playing in the Roundball Classic here in Charleston.It doesn’t mean they’ve forgotten about it, especially since their former coach John Pearson and mentor Antoine Saunders are getting the classic back together.“For sure, any...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Porter-Gaud grads Khris Middleton and Aaron Nesmith have done a million and one things since playing in the Roundball Classic here in Charleston.

It doesn’t mean they’ve forgotten about it, especially since their former coach John Pearson and mentor Antoine Saunders are getting the classic back together.

“For sure, anything those guys ask me to do, I got to do it, they found me so far in my career since HS, anything they need, they know I’m here for him," said Middleton, who is coming off one heck of a summer.

An NBA Championship, an Olympic Gold Medal, and a brand new baby boy.

Boy, has life changed.

“Changed a lot for the better, keep working, keep praying for more. It is a blessing, to leave as quick as I did, but to get back home and spend time with him and get to know him and also my daughter is what meant most to me over the summer," he said.

How cool for Middleton to celebrate these, the greatest moments of his professional life with those closest to him. You better believe Antoine Saunders and John Pearson were going to be in Milwaukee to see the Bucks win it all.

“It was definitely a fun night for everybody involved- so happy they were able to make it, JP, my folks, a lot of supporting family in Charleston. Fun to see them celebrate and enjoy the night with us all," said Middleton.

Amazing to think, a season that ended with a Porter-Gaud contingent on an NBA floor, started, with one as well.

“He was in NBA when I was in middle school. First he drives me to make NBA. I finally make it to NBA he gotta win a ring and a gold medal to one up me again, more to strive to and look up to so that’s now on the bucket list," said Nesmith, who just wrapped up his rookie season with the Boston Celtics.

A season that took off late, Nesmith showing what he can do. A lethal shooter, an outstanding scorer, and more than capable on the defensive end.

“It was a lot of fun, travel was a lot of fun, seeing places I’ve never been before learning from a bunch of guys I’ve looked up to my whole life. Experience definitely took the lessons I learned with me during summer, improved what I needed to improve on, so this upcoming season I can play a role best of my ability to help my team win games," Nesmith said.

The thing they look forward to now, bringing Porter-Gaud grad Josiah-Jordan James along for this NBA ride down the line.

“Think about all the time, we talk about it all the time, he has to handle business at Tennessee and come up to the league and join me and Khris' something we’ve talked about since we’re little so I can’t wait for it to happen," said Nesmith.

The Roundball Rouser, better book a tee time for three.

What to do for the week of Oct. 13

The Boone Hall Pumpkin PatchThe Boone Hall Pumpkin Patch has become one of the largest fall attractions in the state. This year will mark the 25th year for this event which has become a fall tradition for people of all ages. And this year, Boone Hall is returning to a full event with all attractions and festival favorites after the COVID-19 pandemic led to a smaller version last year.Oct. 1-31. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Fridays-Saturdays; 12-6 p.m., Sundays. $12/ages 2+. Boone Hall Farm. 2434 N. Hwy. 17. Mount Pleasa...

The Boone Hall Pumpkin Patch

The Boone Hall Pumpkin Patch has become one of the largest fall attractions in the state. This year will mark the 25th year for this event which has become a fall tradition for people of all ages. And this year, Boone Hall is returning to a full event with all attractions and festival favorites after the COVID-19 pandemic led to a smaller version last year.

Oct. 1-31. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Fridays-Saturdays; 12-6 p.m., Sundays. $12/ages 2+. Boone Hall Farm. 2434 N. Hwy. 17. Mount Pleasant. boonehallplantation.com

Splash-n-Dash inaugural Bariatric Triathlon

Come cheer on the community’s bariatric patients as they compete in the first-everSplash-n-Dash Bariatric Triathlon. From beginners just starting their weight-loss plansto those who have achieved health goals, everyone is welcome to join.

Oct. 17. 7:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Free to attend. Coastal Carolina Bariatric & Surgical Center.900 Crosscreek Drive. Summerville. ccbariatricandsurgical.com

Pink Promenade Catwalk and Cocktails

This month is Breast cancer Awareness Month, and to honor survivors, Mount Pleasant Towne Center is back hosting the third annual Pink Promenade Catwalk and Cocktails Fundraiser. Enjoy a morning of champagne cocktails, brunch bites and front-row seats to the runway. All proceeds will be donated to the Roper St. Francis Foundation Breast Cancer Program.

Oct. 16. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $25/ticket. Mount Pleasant Towne Center. 1218 Belk Drive. Mount Pleasant. mtpleasanttownecentre.com

Halloween Parent/Child Paint Party

Estuary Beans & Barley is hosting a parent-child painting party for Halloween with a step-by-step instruction from a local artist. The design will be pre-stenciled on canvases before the event. Estuary has an on-site food truck as well as snacks and drinks for everyone who comes out, with a special treat for the kiddos. (And of course, Estuary’s brews will be flowing for those 21+.) Costumes welcomed.

Oct. 14. 6-8 p.m. $30/adult; $25/child. Estuary Beans & Barley. 3538 Meeks Farm Road.Johns Island. estuarybeansandbarley.com

Intro to Natural Dyeing Workshop

Lowcountry fiber artist Kristy Bishop is leading workshop participants through the world of natural dyes and techniques. Whether it be onion skins and annatto seeds from a local grocer, goldenrod picked from the roadside or exotic dyes like indigo or madder root, participants will learn to extract bright and permanent color and dye fabric samples of linen, silk, cotton and wool.

Oct. 16. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Prices vary. Dill Sanctuary. 1163 Riverland Drive. James Island. charlestonmuseum.org

First Coast golf scorecard

Hot shots Double-eagle: TPC Sawgrass Players Stadium Course -- Josh Scobee, No. 9, 520 yards, driver, 5-wood.Eagle-two: Hidden Hills -- Price Poole, No. 8, 325 yards, 5-iron, gap wedge.Hole-in-one: Berkley Hall, Okatie, S.C. -- Sean McGill, No. 8, 144 yards, 9-iron.Age-shooters: Windy Harbor -- Skip Small 73 (age 76). TPC Sawgrass Dye's Valley -- Roger Nic...

Hot shots

Double-eagle: TPC Sawgrass Players Stadium Course -- Josh Scobee, No. 9, 520 yards, driver, 5-wood.

Eagle-two: Hidden Hills -- Price Poole, No. 8, 325 yards, 5-iron, gap wedge.

Hole-in-one: Berkley Hall, Okatie, S.C. -- Sean McGill, No. 8, 144 yards, 9-iron.

Age-shooters: Windy Harbor -- Skip Small 73 (age 76). TPC Sawgrass Dye's Valley -- Roger Nichols 74 (age 84). Eagle Harbor -- William Smith 75, 79 (age 80). Marsh Landing -- John Tancredi 77 (age 78). Jacksonville Beach -- Jerry Walters 79 (age 80). Hidden Hills -- Jon Thompson 82 (age 85). Fleming Island -- Bernard Ross 83 (age 85).

Results

Areawide

NE Florida Seniors: At Palm Harbor -- Flight A, gross, 1. Edric Poitier 76; net. 1. Gerald Bowers 71, 2. Mike Klosterman 71. Flight B, gross, 1. Tony Roberti 79; net, 1. Gene Schiavone 69, 2. Bill Schott 71. Flight C, gross, 1. Mike Watson 84; net, 1. Ken Pitt 74, 2. Richard Gabriel 74. Flight D, gross, 1. John Ellenburg 88; net, 1. Richard Rizzuto 71, 2. Ronald Brzezinski 73.

Jacksonville Women's Association: Senior/Super-senior, second round, at Deercreek (low gross, low net) -- Flight 1, gross, 1. Chris Hunt 72; net, 1. Jody Clark 70, 2. Lou Tenarvitz 74. Flight 2, gross, 1. Lori Collins 76; net, 1. Helen Short 71, 2. Shari Zeimetz 73. Flight 3, gross, 1. Jennifer Eckensberger 81; net, 1. Ann Gutter 73, 2. Athena Ballas 74. Flight four, gross, 1. Tian Jones 83; net, 1. Chrisy Wright 74, 2. Young Kim 75. Flight 5, gross, 1. Terri Wensell 84; net, 1. Chun Jeong 74, 2. Dot Peck 75. Flight 6, gross, 1. Mary Ellen Bear 86; net, 1. Paula Fairley 74, 2. Debra McDermott 76. Flight 7, gross, 1. Linda Boland 95; net, 1.Sandy Brokmeyer 75; net, 1. Kay Buirge 80.

Jacksonville Area Golf Association: Directors tournament, at Hidden Hills (two best net balls) -- 1. John Milton, Lee Fields, Price Poole, George Halvorsen 136. 2. Charlie Kicklighter, Joe Grippi, Jack Morehead, John Tancredi 138. 3. Jeff Adams, Ron Smith, Allan Dolman, Vince Celestino 141.

Associations

Men

Westside Seniors: Captain's choice, at Bent Creek -- 1. Rufus Holton, Bob Hall, Robert Pasusinski, Rudy Rauco 64. T2. Ken Buxton, Cameron Simonton, Phil Lowell; Donnie Day, Bob Soper, Ron Russ, Pops Bonkowski 66. 4. Ian Nelson, Dee McClaren, Marty Brown, Pat Laffey 67.

Women

Blue Sky: Low net (Oct. 12) -- 1. Mercedes Lopez 67, 2. Rosemary McNatt 67, 3. Deb Avery 74, 4. Judy Hitzing 78. Net captain's choice (Oct. 5) -- 1. Mercedes Lopez, Arlene Miller, Debbie Scobie 61. 2. Maggie Hand, Shirley Brink, Judy Hitzing, Tammy Power 62. 3. Rosemary McNatt, Sandi Schorner, Karen Vanetti 63.

On the tee

Email submissions to gsmits@gannett.com.

Oct. 18: Jacksonville Area Golf Association Fall Four-Ball, Deercreek.

Oct. 20: Jacksonville Women's Association, Senior-Super Senior Championship, round three, Jacksonville Beach.

Oct. 24: 22nd annual Clay County Gator Club Scholarship Tournament, Magnolia Point. Registration 10:30 a.m., shotgun start noon. To preregister and pay online or for more information, visit claygators.com; North Florida Junior Golf Tour, at St. Johns Golf Club. Visit nfjg.org.

Oct. 25: High school district tournaments -- District 2-2A boys, Eagle Harbor; District 4-2A boys, Palatka Golf Club; District 3-1A boys, Quail Heights, Lake City; District 4-1A boys, Glen Kernan; District 4-1A girls, Jacksonville Beach Golf Club.

Oct. 26: High school district tournaments -- District 3-3A boys, Eagle Landing; District 2-3A girls, Hawkstone Golf Club, Gainesville; District 3-3A girls, St. Johns G&CC; District 2-2A girls, Lake City Country Club; District 3-2A girls, Fernandina Beach Municipal; District 4-2A girls, Palatka Golf Club; District 3-2A boys, Fernandina Beach Municipal; District 4-2A girls, Palatka Golf Club; District 3-1A girls, Quail Heights Golf Club, Lake City.

Oct. 27: High school district tournament -- District 2-3A boys, Ocala Golf Club; Jacksonville Women's Association, Blue Sky.

Oct. 26-28: PXG Women's Match Play Championship, stroke-play tournament, King & Bear. Visit womensmatchplaychampionship.com.

Oct. 29-30: FSGA Senior Two-Player Shoot-Out, Buckhorn Springs Golf and Country Club, Valrico. Visit fsga.org.

Oct. 30-31: North Florida Junior Golf Tour King & Bear Open. Visit nfjg.org.

Nov. 1: High school regional tournaments -- Region 1-3A boys, Cypress Head Golf Club, Port Orange; Region 1-2A boys, Golden Ocala; Region 1-1A boys, Marsh Landing; Region 1-3A girls, Hawkstone Golf Club, Gainesville; Region 1-2A girls, Turkey Creek Golf Club, Alachua; Region 1-1A girls, St. Johns G&CC; Region 3-1A girls, University of Florida.

Nov. 3: Jacksonville Women's Association, Sarah Shelly Tournament, Round one, Golf Club of Amelia.

Nov. 1-4: PXG Women's Match Play Championship, Slammer & Squire. Visit womensmatchplaychampionship.com.

Nov. 9: Jacksonville Area Golf Association directors meeting, Fleming Island.

Nov. 9-10: FHSAA Class 1A state tournament, Mission Inn Resort, Howey-in-the-Hills.

Nov. 10: Jacksonville Women's Association, Sarah Shelly Tournament, round two, Deerwood.

Nov. 12-13: FHSAA Class 2A state tournament, Mission Inn Resort, Howey-in-the-Hills.

Nov. 14: North Florida Junior Golf Tour The National, Amelia National. Visit nfjg.org.

Nov. 16-17: FHSAA Class 3A state tournament, Mission Inn Resort, Howey-in-the-Hills.

Nov. 17: Jacksonville Women's Association, Sarah Shelly Tournament, round three, Palencia.

Nov. 18: North Florida Junior Golf Tour Billy Maxwel Memorial, Hyde Park. Visit nfjg.org.

Nov. 18-21: PGA Tour RSM Classic, Sea Island Club, St. Simons Island, Ga.

Nov. 21: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, The Harbor Open, Eagle Harbor. Visit nfjg.org.

Nov. 22-24: Jacksonville Area Golf Association Club Team Championship, Slammer & Squire.

Nov. 28: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Open at the Hills, at Hidden Hills. Visit nfjg.org.

Dec. 5: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Plantation Bay Open, Plantation Bay, Prestwick Course, Ormond Beach. Visit nfjg.org.

Dec. 8: Jacksonville Women's Association, Grandmother's Tournament, Cimarrone.

Dec. 11-12: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Hall of Fame Invitational, Slammer & Squire. Visit nfjg.org. FSGA Foursomes Championship, Lakewood Ranch Golf and Country Club. Visit fsga.org.

Dec. 13: Jacksonville Women's Association, Christmas Tournament, Sawgrass Country Club.

Dec. 14: Jacksonville Area Golf Association annual meeting, Deerwood.

Dec. 18: Jacksonville Area Golf Association Family Championship, Jacksonville Beach Golf Club. Visit jaxreagolf.org.

Dec. 18-19: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Par-3 Championship, Palm Valley. Visit nfjg.org.

Dec. 21-22: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, First Coast Junior Amateur, Jacksonville Beach Golf Club. Visit nfjg.org.

Dec. 29: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, The Yards. Visit nfjg.org.

2022

Jan. 11: Jacksonville Area Golf Association directors tournament, San Jose.

Jan. 15-17: First Coast Amateur, Conservatory Course at Hammock Beach, Palm Coast. Visit jaxareagolf.org.

Jan. 17: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Ponte Vedra Open, Marsh Landing. Visit nfjg.org.

Jan. 19: Jacksonville Women's Association, Marsh Creek.

Jan. 23: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, The Harbor Challenge, Eagle Harbor. Visit nfjg.org.

Jan. 26: Jacksonville Women's Association, Eagle Harbor.

Jan. 30: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Showdown at Bent Creek. Visit nfjg.org.

Feb. 2: Jacksonville Women's Association, Handicap Tournament, round one, King & Bear.

Feb. 6: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, St. Johns Open, St. Johns Golf and Country Club. Visit nfjg.org.

Feb. 9: Jacksonville Women's Association, Handicap Tournament, round two, Jacksonville G&CC.

Feb. 16: Jacksonville Women's Association, Handicap Tournament, round three, South Hampton.

Feb. 19-21: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Team Match Play Championship, Magnolia Point. Visit nfjg.org.

Feb. 23: Jacksonville Women's Association, Windy Harbor.

March 2: Jacksonville Women's Association, Presidents Cup, Fleming Island.

March 5-6: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Palatka Junior Azalea, Palatka Golf Club. Visit nfjg.org.

March 10-13: The Players Championship, Players Stadium Course, TPC Sawgrass. Visit theplayers.com.

March 16: Jacksonville Women's Association, Anniversary Tournament, Queen's Harbour.

March 23: Jacksonville Women's Association, Past Presidents Tournament, St. Johns G&CC.

March 27: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Oak Marsh Challenge, Omni Amelia Oak Marsh. Visit nfjg.org.

March 30: Jacksonville Women's Association, Championship qualifier, Jacksonville Beach.

April 3: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Bent Creek Open. Visit nfjg.org.

April 6: Jacksonville Women's Association, Championship Tournament, round one, Eagle Harbor.

April 7-10: Masters Tournament, Augusta National Golf Club, Augusta, Ga.

April 13: Jacksonville Women's Association, Championship Tournament, round two, North Hampton.

April 16: North Florida Junior Golf Tour University of Florida Open, Mark Bostwick Golf Course, Gainesville. Visit nfjg.org.

April 20: Jacksonville Women's Association, Championship Tournament, round three, Eagle Landing.

April 28: Jacksonville Women's Association, Mixed Couples Tournament, Queen's Harbor.

May 4: Jacksonville Women's Association, Hidden Hills.

May 11: Jacksonville Women's Association, Closing Tournament, Amelia National.

May 15: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Boomer Invitational, Trident Lakes, King's Bay, Ga. Visit nfjg.org.

May 19-22: PGA Championship, Southern Hills Country Club, Tulsa, Okla.

May 22: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Bill Straub Sr. Adult-Junior, Amelia National. Visit nfjg.org.

June 15-16: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Dr. Gordon Ira Golf Classic, Hyde Park. Visit nfjg.org.

June 16-19: U.S. Open, The Country Club, Brookline, Mass.

June 21-22: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Jax Beach Junior Open, Jacksonville Beach Golf Club. Visit nfjg.org.

July 5-6: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, St. Augustine Junior, King & Bear. Visit nfjg.org.

July 11-12: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Greater Jacksonville Junior Championship, Eagle Harbor. Visit nfjg.org.

July 14-17: British Open, St. Andrews, Scotland.

July 18: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, NFJG Tour Challenge, South Hampton. Visit nfjg.org.

July 23-24: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, North Florida Junior Amateur, Slammer & Squire. Visit nfjg.org.

July 25: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, San Jose Classic, San Jose Country Club. Visit nfjg.org.

Aug. 1-2: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, NFJG Tour Championship, Marsh Landing. Visit nfjg.org.

Aug. 8: North Florida Junior Golf Tour, Tournament of Champions, Ponte Vedra Inn and Club Lagoon Course. Visit nfjg.org.

Johns Island residents, groups discuss proposed tax plan on future developments

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - People who live on Johns Island and community groups are weighing in on the city’s proposal to raise funs to finance infrastructure projects.The Municipal Improvement District is a form of tax assessment, according to City of Charleston Director of Planning, Preservation and Sustainability Robert Summerfield.He says this assessment would be taken from future developments, not existing homes or properties, and the money would go to projects only on Johns Island.The Johns Island Task Force...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - People who live on Johns Island and community groups are weighing in on the city’s proposal to raise funs to finance infrastructure projects.

The Municipal Improvement District is a form of tax assessment, according to City of Charleston Director of Planning, Preservation and Sustainability Robert Summerfield.

He says this assessment would be taken from future developments, not existing homes or properties, and the money would go to projects only on Johns Island.

The Johns Island Task Force, which is an alliance between several community organizations on the island, just sent a letter to Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg in support of the project but with some recommendations.

The task force is urging officials to use those funds to create a “framework of civic activity,” instead of many individual and isolated projects. Some of the recommendations listed in the Johns Island Task Force letter include an Island Center for community activities, a network of roads parallel to Maybank, and a CARTA bus route along Maybank.

Summerfield said officials are happy to get the feedback.

“[The Johns Island Task Force,] not only are they on board with this opportunity to raise these funds, but they’re also thinking about specific projects that in the future this money could be put toward, and that’s tremendous,” he said. “There’s nothing on this this list that’s not a potential fundable project once the MID is adopted and we start seeing some revenue from it.”

Not everyone on Johns Island is sold on the project.

“I’m not a big fan of it,” Johns Island native Thomas Legare said. “I think new homes, both in the city of Charleston and the county of Charleston, should pay some type of impact fee, but I don’t think the taxpayer or the homeowner should be the ones paying it.”

Instead, Legare said he believes homebuilders and developers should be the ones to pay a fee to fund development projects in the area.

“They’re the ones that should be adding that into the price of their homes or taking it out of their profits,” he said. “When they’re issued a building permit, they should be paying the impact fee that would go toward improving our infrastructure.”

Summerfield said community members like Legare will be able to share their opinions and concerns about the MID at the public hearing on Aug. 17.

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