Trademark Attorney in Charleston, SC

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At Sausser Summers, PC, our goal is to make the trademark registration process as straightforward and cost-effective as possible, so that you can focus on growing your business while we take the necessary steps to protect what you have worked so hard to build.

Unlike other law firms, Sausser Summers, PC provides flat fee trademark services at an affordable price. Our goal is to eliminate the uncertainty that comes with hourly work, so you know exactly how much your total expenses will be at the outset of our relationship.

With a BBB A+ rating, we are consistently ranked as one of the top trademark law firms in the U.S. We aim to provide you with the same five-star service that you would receive from large firms, with a modern twist at a rate that won’t break the bank.

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How Sausser Summers, PC Flat Fee Trademark Service Works

Our flat fee trademark process is simple, streamlined, and consists of three steps:

Our three-step process lets you:

Trademark Services at a Glance

Whether you need help maintaining your current trademark or require assistance canceling an abandoned mark, Sausser Summers, PC is here to help. Here are just a few of the trademark services that we provide to clients:

Comprehensive Trademark Search

For many entrepreneurs, this is the first and most crucial step to take when it’s time to safeguard your business and intellectual property. Your trademark attorney in Charleston will conduct a thorough search of the USPTO Federal Trademark Database and each U.S state’s trademark database. We will also perform a trademark domain name search and a trademark common law search on your behalf. We will follow up with a 30-minute phone call, where we will discuss the results of our trademark search and send you a drafted legal opinion letter.

U.S. Trademark Filing

Once your trademark lawyer in Charleston has completed a comprehensive trademark search, the next step is to file a trademark application. We will submit your application within 1-3 business days and keep you updated on its USPTO status throughout the registration process.

U.S Trademark Office Actions – These actions are essentially initial rejections of your trademark by the USPTO. Applicants have six months in which to respond to this rejection. For a flat fee, your trademark lawyer from Sausser Summers, PC will compose

U.S Trademark Renewal

If you already own a trademark, Sausser Summers, PC will renew your registered trademark so that it remains current. Extended protection varies depending on how long you have held your trademark. We encourage you to visit our U.S Trademark Renewal page to find out which renewal service best fits your current situation.

U.S. Trademark Cease & Desist

Whether you have been accused of infringing on someone’s trademark and received a cease and desist letter or have found an infringer on your own mark, it is imperative that you respond. If you have received a letter and do not respond, you might be sued. If you find an infringer and do not demand that they stop, you may lose your trademark rights. To discuss the best course of action for your situation, we recommend you contact Sausser Summers, PC, for a risk-free consultation at no additional cost. Once you speak directly to one of our attorneys, we will send your cease and desist letter or respond to the one you have received for an affordable flat fee.

Statement of Use

If you plan on using your mark in commerce, you must file a Statement of Use to notify the USPTO. This filing must take place six months after you receive your Notice of Allowance. For an affordable flat-rate fee, your trademark attorney in Charleston will make any requisite filings on your behalf. Before you decide on a course of action, we encourage you to contact our office at (843) 654-0078 to speak with one of our attorneys. This consultation will help us get a better understanding of your situation and is always free and confidential.

U.S. Trademark Filing of Name and Logo

I Have a Word Mark & Logo!

*USPTO filing fee of $250 for one international class is included, as mentioned above. Additional fees will apply if multiple classes. If you have any questions about the total cost please contact us prior to submitting this form.

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Latest News in Charleston

Fall treats in Charleston, SC

October is here, and so is the need for fall-flavored-everything. Halloween decorations come out, pumpkin aromas fill the air, and the demand for the fall-flavored drinks + treats hit coffee shops.Tidal Grounds Coffee, 1039 Hwy 41, Ste. 200. Mt. Pleasant | This seasonal menu features autumn spice lattes, cherry pie lattes, pumpkin spice lattes, and a variety of baked goods from Bakies + Brown’s Court bakery....

October is here, and so is the need for fall-flavored-everything. Halloween decorations come out, pumpkin aromas fill the air, and the demand for the fall-flavored drinks + treats hit coffee shops.

Tidal Grounds Coffee, 1039 Hwy 41, Ste. 200. Mt. Pleasant | This seasonal menu features autumn spice lattes, cherry pie lattes, pumpkin spice lattes, and a variety of baked goods from Bakies + Brown’s Court bakery.

Mercantile and Mash,701 East Bay St. | Check out the golden tahini latte made with tahini, cinnamon, and turmeric, the apple chai latte, or the maple mash — a house made cold brew topped with maple-espresso cream.

Lodi Coffee, 2210 Ashley Phosphate Rd., North Charleston | Lodi has several fall drinks including 4 house made pumpkin spice options — the latte, cream matcha, cream cold brew, and a frapp. You can also opt for apple flavored beverages including a frapp, latte, cream cold brew, and matcha. The Gravedigger Frapp will hit the menu exclusively for the week of Halloween + a cranapple refresher will be available starting November 1.

Daddy’s Girls Bakery, 2021B Reynolds Ave., Ste. 102, North Charleston | This bakery is serving up Chewie cheesecake, pumpkin bread, butter pecan cake, and pecan pies.

Stuffed Cupcakes, online | Check out the caramel vanilla pumpkin spice latte cupcakes + the spooky marshmallow cereal treats.

Springbok Coffee Roasters, 708 King St. | If pumpkin spice isn’t your jam — try a Cherry Pie latte at Springbok.

Biggby Coffee, 903 St. Andrews Blvd. + 8465 Dorchester Rd., North Charleston | The autumn options include the pumpkin spice latte, sweet foam pumpkin cold brew and a “chumpkin” spice latte” which is a combination of Chai and pumpkin Spice, You can also check out the Jack-O-Lantern Latte, Black Forest Latte, and Vampire creme freeze for the spooky season vibes.

Vintage Coffee Cafe, 219 Simmons St., Mt. Pleasant | Nothing says autumn like pumpkin spice lattés + apple cider donuts.

BKeDSHoP, 99 Westedge St. + 408 Nexton Square, Summerville | BKeD has a variety of fall donut flavors including pumpkin spice, brown butter apple waffle, pumpkin cake, pumpkin apple fritter, and sprinkle and pumpkin cream cold brew. They also have pumpkin hohos on the menu.

Sugar Bake Shop, 59 1/2 Cannon St. | Sugar Bake has pumpkin pie, buttermilk pie, and apple loaves with caramel icing. They also have lots of cupcake options, including s’mores, pumpkin ginger, chai, apple spice with housemade caramel icing, apple pie filled cupcakes, and cookie dough cupcakes.

Barista Bear Coffee Company, locations vary | Tons of seasonal drinks on the menu including the pumpkin spice latte, butter pecan latte, caramel apple latte, salted caramel mocha, and pumpkin chai.

Grey Ghost Bakery, 1028 Wappoo Rd. | Molasses spice, cranberry orange, and almond toffee flavored cookies are on the menu at Grey Ghost. Pair your fall cookies with a pumpkin spice latte.

SHaPE SC task force to discuss environmental, health frameworks Tuesday

A group convened to evaluate the overall infrastructure in South Carolina for health and environmental services will soon be drawing up its final report after a Tuesday meeting.The Task Force to Strengthen the Health and Promote the Environment of South Carolina (SHaPE SC) is holding its final meeting 1-4 p.m., Oct. 19, at the University of South Carolina in Columbia.Created April 8 by the Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) with app...

A group convened to evaluate the overall infrastructure in South Carolina for health and environmental services will soon be drawing up its final report after a Tuesday meeting.

The Task Force to Strengthen the Health and Promote the Environment of South Carolina (SHaPE SC) is holding its final meeting 1-4 p.m., Oct. 19, at the University of South Carolina in Columbia.

Created April 8 by the Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) with approval from its board, the group is composed of experts from colleges, health organizations and leaders from advocacy groups and nonprofits across the state. The task force began with two central goals:

“We are honored to have enlisted the service of some of the most intelligent, innovative, and thoughtful minds South Carolina has to offer,” said DHEC director Dr. Edward Simmer, in a press release. “Together, they have thoughtfully identified what we as a state are doing well when it comes to providing health and environmental services, as well as core areas for improvement.”

SHaPE SC is split into three subcommittees that have been meeting separately and together since April, with each one covering specific areas and bringing nuanced recommendations to the table.

The Behavioral Health subcommittee during its most recent meeting Aug. 4, put forth seven detailed recommendations to address a number of shortcomings, gaps and critical challenges, including lack of coordination in housing and employment opportunities, gaps in workforce development for behavioral health professionals and stigma associated with receiving behavioral health services.

The Environmental Protection subcommittee at its most recent meeting Aug. 24 noted that while it had no formal recommendations toward what it called a “Bright Tomorrow,” a few possibilities have come to light for realignment and restructuring existing agencies. No consensus had yet been reached.

The Health subcommittee similarly did not share formally proposed recommendations during its most recent meeting Aug. 31, opting instead to share reports and findings at a full task force meeting at a later date.

The task force will review and discuss its final recommendations to improve the future of health and environmental services in the Palmetto State during Tuesday’s full task force meeting. Then, SHaPE SC will provide a report of its recommendations to the DHEC board for review and approval before submission to the legislature and Gov. Henry McMaster.

A final report will be published online, and the meeting proceedings will be open and available to the public online, meetiing ID 481-349-756, and by phone at 1 (864) 558-7311. A recording of the meeting and minutes will be available after its conclusion.

SC unveils portrait of Reconstruction-era Black senator

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — South Carolina has put up a portrait of a Reconstruction-era Black lawmaker in the state Senate chamber — part of an effort to recognize a broader array of historical figures in a place that once flew the Confederate battle flag at the Statehouse.Some lawmakers who worked for the recognition of the late Sen. Stephen Atkins Swails said they are unhappy the painting went up without a ceremony, ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — South Carolina has put up a portrait of a Reconstruction-era Black lawmaker in the state Senate chamber — part of an effort to recognize a broader array of historical figures in a place that once flew the Confederate battle flag at the Statehouse.

Some lawmakers who worked for the recognition of the late Sen. Stephen Atkins Swails said they are unhappy the painting went up without a ceremony, The State reported.

“I think it deserves more recognition than a last-minute, knee-jerk email from the president of the Senate under the cloak of darkness,” said Democratic Sen. Sen. Marlon Kimpson of Charleston.

The newspaper reported that after an email about the portrait was sent to senators and staff Thursday, one white state senator hit “reply all” with a comment about Swails’ complexion.

“That sure is the whitest looking black guy I’ve ever seen,” Republican Sen. Sandy Senn of Charleston wrote, adding an emoji of a person shrugging. “Anyway, thanks for sharing!”

Reached Friday, Senn told The State she could not believe her response had become “this big news story.”

“I really cannot understand why one of my Senate colleagues would think my observation, which was spot-on, was anything inappropriate or sinister because it wasn’t,” Senn said.

Kimpson said he didn’t want to discuss Senn’s comments.

“I think it distracts from the historic significance of this portrait,” Kimpson said. “There ought to be a front-page story about Sgt. Swails, not these sideshow comments.”

Swails was born in Pennsylvania to a Black father and a white mother in 1832, and went to South Carolina in the military. He stormed Fort Wagner on Morris Island as part of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, one of the nation’s first Black fighting units whose story was immortalized in the film “Glory.” In 1865, he became the first commissioned Black officer in the Union Army. After military service, Swails stayed in South Carolina to work for the Freedman’s Bureau.

He was also a businessman, newspaper editor and lawyer. He served in the South Carolina Senate from 1868 to 1878, becoming its first Black president pro tempore.

In a 2008 resolution, state lawmakers said Swails provided leadership “during the turbulent years of the Reconstruction period, in which the struggle for civil rights began in earnest.” Their resolution sought to honor Swails with a portrait in the Senate chamber, which has rows of pictures, most depicting white men.

MUSC predicts 2-month COVID cycle, says percentage of people being hospitalized declining

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Officials at the Medical University of South Carolina say the COVID-19 pandemic has settled into a 2-month pattern, based off the peaks and troughs of the virus over the past year and a half.Data from the MUSC COVID-19 Tracking Team shows the first wave of COVID began in June 2020 and came down months later in August. Then, the next major wave started in November and eventually began to fall again in January.It’s a trend, Dr. Michael Sweat—the leader of the COVID tracking team—says wi...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Officials at the Medical University of South Carolina say the COVID-19 pandemic has settled into a 2-month pattern, based off the peaks and troughs of the virus over the past year and a half.

Data from the MUSC COVID-19 Tracking Team shows the first wave of COVID began in June 2020 and came down months later in August. Then, the next major wave started in November and eventually began to fall again in January.

It’s a trend, Dr. Michael Sweat—the leader of the COVID tracking team—says will likely continue.

“When the numbers go up, we have history that shows they’ll come down again,” he said. “When they come down, people need to be aware that they will often come back up again. We’ve been through this several times where the numbers sort of drop pretty quickly and many people think it’s gone and it’s over with. So that’s something to be aware of that these waves sort of can come quickly. I would just encourage people to remain vigilant.”

Sweat predicts another wave in the coming months.

“As we approach winter, I do think there’s a significant risk we’re going to see an increase in the number of infections,” he says. “When you just look around the country right now, where the highest rates of growth are and the highest number of cases are occurring are in cold places: Alaska, Minnesota, Wisconsin, the Dakotas, Colorado. All of those people are seeing increases right now.”

Being proactive about behaviors that prevent the spread of the virus is important to stay on top of the 2-month patterns, according to Sweat.

“It’s shown very clearly in the science that what matters most for slowing these peaks is to implement reductions and behaviors early, as it’s climbing,” he says. “When the numbers are going up rapidly, that’s when people ought to be particularly careful about being inside crowded places with poor ventilation and with wearing masks. Often what’s happening is these numbers shoot up and they shoot up very quickly and by the time people realize that the spread of the virus has really gotten out into communities and it’ll play out.”

Sweat says there is, however, some good news. The percentage of people diagnosed with COVID who end up in the hospital is declining.

“It was 25 percent in the first wave, then in the winter wave it was around 15 percent—maybe lower,” he said in a release. “And then in this current wave, we’re down here around 10 percent. It’s all suggesting that immunity is starting to have an effect.”

Sweat says these numbers mean the vaccine and immunity within the community are starting to have an effect.

Data from the COVID tracking team shows COVID’s impact on the Charleston has been reduced from “severe” to significant. That data is based on the number of reported cases per day per 100,000 people. Sweat says the rate has dropped to about 22 cases per 100,000 people, which is the lowest it’s been since July, according to MUSC.

“I do want to emphasize the best way we can get to high levels of immunity and stop this epidemic going to be vaccination,” Sweat says. “And also people who have been infected, it’s been demonstrably proven that getting a vaccine after you’ve had an infection is absolutely an important thing to do and it actually puts those people in a position of having some of the best protection of anybody.”

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

SC Ports Authority says it can’t support current plan for Charleston flood wall

A representative of the State Ports Authority said a proposed hurricane surge wall for downtown Charleston conflicts with the agency’s plans for two properties on the Cooper River.One of them — Union Pier, is where cruise ships used to dock before the coronavirus pandemic and where SPA is working on a redevelopment plan that will eventually put the land in private hands.The other, Columbus Street Terminal, is used to export Volvos and BMWs that are built in South Carolina and holds $600 million in autos at any given...

A representative of the State Ports Authority said a proposed hurricane surge wall for downtown Charleston conflicts with the agency’s plans for two properties on the Cooper River.

One of them — Union Pier, is where cruise ships used to dock before the coronavirus pandemic and where SPA is working on a redevelopment plan that will eventually put the land in private hands.

The other, Columbus Street Terminal, is used to export Volvos and BMWs that are built in South Carolina and holds $600 million in autos at any given time.

Jordi Yarborough, senior vice president of external affairs at SPA, made the comments Sept. 22 at the public meeting of a committee convened to give input on the $1.1 billion wall plan from the Army Corps of Engineers. Yarborough was protesting a proposed path for the wall that would leave the terminal and pier on the outside.

“As it stands now, we can’t be supportive of this,” Yarborough said.

The comments are some of the most significant opposition to the plan so far as the Corps has slowly refined it for the past year and a half. They also underscore the challenges of placing a wall around a city where many businesses rely on access to the water, even as sea level rise and hurricanes pose a persistent threat.

The Corps’ plan, designed to protect Charleston from the surge of ocean water that comes with a cyclone, includes a wall that rises about 8 feet past the point where the city floods from tides. It would wrap around the city for 8 miles, include dozens of gates that would stay open during dry times and 10 pumps to evacuate rainfall when those gates are closed to rising tides.

Yarborough also said during the meeting she hasn’t been able to get a clear answer on whether the agency could convince the Corps to move the wall later if the city proceeds with the plan and engineers start a more detailed design.

Dale Morris, Charleston’s chief resiliency officer, responded that the wall’s path can be moved in that next design phase, preconstruction engineering and design, also referred to as PED.

Corps spokeswoman Jaclyn Pennoyer confirmed this in an email, and said the wall could be moved because of new building technology, the results of further engineering analysis, buried cultural resources, buried utilities or situations where the Corps can’t secure the land it needs to build.

But there are significant challenges for where to put a wall at the ports’ sites, Morris added.

Right now, the wall would run landward of SPA’s facilities, along Morrison Drive and East Bay Street west of the Columbus Street Terminal, and along Washington Street west of Union Pier.

Moving it into the water, on the opposite side of the terminal and pier, would likely spur strong objections from state and federal agencies that regulate the environment, Morris said. (Indeed, those groups objected last year when parts of the wall were placed in water or marsh.) Building in water can also be three times more expensive than building on land, Morris and Pennoyer said.

In an interview after the meeting, Morris said it’s a goal of the city to protect the ports’ sites, especially Union Pier, where there could one day be a mixed-use development of housing and commercial space. A better option might be a wall that crosses the sites at the high water lines, he said, leaving some of the facilities protected but avoiding the issues with building in the Cooper River.

“The port’s concerns about being outside of the structure are legit, and we’re with them,” Morris told the Post and Courier.

Yarborough did not respond to a follow-up phone message after the meeting.

In an email, SPA spokeswoman Liz Crumley wrote, “SC Ports will continue working with the City of Charleston and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide input on the sea wall proposal to ensure no adverse impacts to marine terminal operations on the peninsula.”

The committee where Yarborough made her comments was convened in the spring and includes residents, businesspeople, and members of the environmental and preservation communities in Charleston. It is due to give Charleston City Council a recommendation on whether to pursue the wall plan this autumn, though the date for that presentation has been pushed a few times.

City Council is also expected to vote on whether to pursue the wall plan into the more-detailed PED step by the end of the year. If it does so, it will have to certify that Charleston can pay for its part of the project, about $384.5 million.

On Sept. 22, several members of the advisory group said there was still more investigation needed before making a recommendation on the plan, and that it had been hard to get answers on details of the wall and how the city of Charleston will fund its portion of the work.

“The answers that we’re getting are ‘Don’t worry, it will be handled in PED,’ ” said Dan Battista of real estate developer Lowe. The company is helping SPA prepare plans for Union Pier.

“Under the current due diligence, a lot more needs to be done,” Battista added. “I don’t want to be rushed to have to make a decision.”

But Morris said that without moving forward into the next step in the engineering process, Charleston would never get an answer on whether there is a wall alignment that would work in complicated settings such as around the SPA terminals.

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